Video: Why peeing in the pool is more than just gross

August 16, 2016, American Chemical Society
Credit: The American Chemical Society

Summer would not be the same without the sweet smell of swimming pools. But behind the familiar smell is the hazard of disinfection byproducts, or DBPs.

While chlorine and other disinfectants help prevent microorganisms from colonizing your pool, the cleaning products can also react with organic substances—including urine—to create DBPs.

Learn about pool chemistry and how you can limit your exposure to DBPs in this week's Reactions video:

Explore further: What's really in your swimming pool?

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