GM begins autonomous car tests in Scottsdale, Arizona

August 9, 2016

General Motors and its autonomous technology company Cruise Automation are testing self-driving cars on the streets of Scottsdale, Arizona.

Testing of self-driving electric Chevrolet Bolts began in Arizona about two weeks ago. It's the second city for GM's real-world tests. Autonomous Bolts with Cruise Automation software have been driving around San Francisco since May 20.

GM spokesman Kevin Kelly says the company is considering other cities for tests but wasn't ready to announce locations.

He would not say how many Bolts are being tested. Although the cars drive autonomously, Kelly says they all have human backup drivers.

GM acquired San Francisco-based Cruise Automation in March for $581 million in cash and GM stock. Kelly says the company has opened an office in Scottsdale.

Explore further: GM buys software company to speed autonomous car development

Related Stories

GM sees self-driving cars as gradual rollout

July 11, 2016

General Motors believes in autonomous vehicles as a safer mode of transport, and expects the technology to come more quickly than most people think, a top executive said Monday.

Why driverless cars still need driving tests

July 25, 2016

Joshua Brown was reportedly watching a Harry Potter film when the "autopilot" function of his Tesla Model S drove the car into a truck, instantly killing him. This incident, the first time someone died from an accident involving ...

Recommended for you

Robots as tools and partners in rehabilitation

August 17, 2018

In future decades, the need for effective strategies for medical rehabilitation will increase significantly, because patients' rate of survival after diseases with severe functional deficits, such as a stroke, will increase. ...

Security gaps identified in internet protocol IPsec

August 15, 2018

In collaboration with colleagues from Opole University in Poland, researchers at Horst Görtz Institute for IT Security (HGI) at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have demonstrated that the internet protocol IPsec is vulnerable ...

Researchers find flaw in WhatsApp

August 8, 2018

Researchers at Israeli cybersecurity firm said Wednesday they had found a flaw in WhatsApp that could allow hackers to modify and send fake messages in the popular social messaging app.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.