Baby giraffe born at Santa Barbara Zoo seen on video

March 29, 2016
Baby giraffe born at Santa Barbara Zoo seen on video
This Monday, March 28, 2016 photo provided by the Santa Barbara Zoo shows a newborn baby giraffe and its mother, Audrey, in Santa Barbara, Calif. The unnamed Masai giraffe was born Saturday, March 26. (Santa Barbara Zoo/www.sbzoo.org via AP)

The public is getting its first glimpse of a baby Masai giraffe born over the weekend at the Santa Barbara Zoo.

The zoo posted online video Monday of the still-unnamed calf bonding with its mother, Audrey, behind the scenes in their barn.

The calf, born Saturday, is already 191 pounds and over 6 feet tall.

There's no word on when the newborn will be introduced into the giraffe exhibit for viewing by .

This Monday, March 28, 2016 photo provided by the Santa Barbara Zoo shows a newborn baby giraffe and its mother, Audrey, in Santa Barbara, Calif. The unnamed Masai giraffe was born Saturday, March 26. (Santa Barbara Zoo/www.sbzoo.org via AP)

The Ventura County Star newspaper reports (http://bit.ly/1Uzmvdr ) that it's the fourth for Audrey at the zoo. Her last calf, Buttercup, was born in November 2014.

The 's other female giraffe, Betty Lou, is in her third pregnancy and is expected to give birth in July.

Explore further: Big baby: Los Angeles Zoo's new giraffe is just under 6 feet

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