Voting open for top climate change innovations

August 6, 2015 by Laur Fisher, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
The MIT Climate CoLab seeks final votes for climate change sustainability ideas in 15 contests. Credit: MIT Climate CoLab

The MIT Climate CoLab has opened public voting to select the top innovative ideas on how to tackle climate change.

A project of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence, the Climate CoLab is an online platform where a growing community of over 35,000 experts and non-experts around the world work together to develop and select proposals to help solve this massive, complex issue.

Each year, the Climate CoLab runs over 15 contests focused on different issues related to , such as decarbonizing the energy supply, implementing a price on carbon, and shifting public attitudes and behaviors. Over the last six months, contest judges evaluated the proposals submitted to the platform and selected 58 contest finalists.

From now until September 12, the public is invited to cast their votes for one proposal in each contest. The author with the most votes will win that contest's Popular Choice Award and, along with the Judges' Choice winners, will receive a special invitation to attend select sessions at MIT's SOLVE conference and present their proposals before key constituents at the MIT Crowds and Climate conference October 5-6, where a $10,000 grand prize will be awarded.

The popular U.S. Carbon Price contest returned this year, which sought innovative policy and political mobilization strategies on how to implement a carbon price in the United States. Serving as advisors for this contest are former U.S. Secretary of State George P. Shultz; former U.S. Rep. (R-SC) and current director of the Energy and Enterprise Initiative Bob Inglis; and former U.S. Rep. (D-IN) and current president of Resources for the Future Phil Sharp.

A number of contests were run in collaboration with organizations such as the World Bank (Urban Energy Efficiency), the American Geophsyical Union (Anticipating Climate Change in the Pamir Mountains) the MIT Sloan Latin America Office (Energy Solutions for Latin America), and the City of Somerville, Massachusetts (Atypical Solutions for Going Carbon Neutral).

Serving as judges for the 15 contests are over 60 experts from MIT, Stanford University, Columbia University, Tokyo University, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, the International Energy Agency, the World Bank, the United Nations, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Energy, the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Carbon War Room, the Clinton Climate Initiative, the World Resources Institute, the Paulson Institute, Lockheed Martin, Goldman Sachs, Shell, and many other institutes and organizations.

To vote for your favorite finalists, visit the Climate CoLab website, register for a free profile, browse the 2015 finalists list, and select the "Vote for proposal" button on their proposal page. Each registered voter can support one proposal per .

Explore further: Crowdsourcing climate strategy

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8 comments

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classicplastic
3 / 5 (2) Aug 07, 2015
The lemmings still don't get it. None of these entries are actually going to make a damned bit of difference in the final outcome.

This will: http://williamcal...mits.pdf
Earthman
3 / 5 (2) Aug 07, 2015
Seems to ignore the thermal inversion created by the pumping.
antigoracle
1 / 5 (1) Aug 07, 2015
The lemmings still don't get it. None of these entries are actually going to make a damned bit of difference in the final outcome.

This will: http://williamcal...mits.pdf

Wow!!
Were you born this stupid or dropped as a baby?
classicplastic
3 / 5 (2) Aug 07, 2015
The lemmings still don't get it. None of these entries are actually going to make a damned bit of difference in the final outcome.

This will: http://williamcal...mits.pdf

Wow!!
Were you born this stupid or dropped as a baby?


I'm a LOT smarter than you've are. Have you got a better idea or are you just a brain-washed suicide bomber? Put up or shut up.
antigoracle
1 / 5 (1) Aug 07, 2015
I'm a LOT smarter than you've are.

Yes..yes...you've are...NOT.

So, you were dropped also.
classicplastic
1 / 5 (1) Aug 07, 2015
Seems to ignore the thermal inversion created by the pumping.


Good question! Thank you!

The raised cold water is pumped back down into the deep ocean, along with the dissolved CO2, which will stay out of atmospheric circulation for at least thousands of years, buying us time.

Dr. Calvin's up- and down-welling demonstration is an example of the concept, not a final design. He's as as much smarter than me as I am of antiwhatsisface.

There are patentable technology designs in the works with a lot more control, and no physical pumps, that sequester the raised water from the general environment and the returned CO2-laden water is precisely re-placed where desired. In-between, some of the captured carbon is recycled into gigatons of inexpensive food, fodder and terror-free algal biofuels, all powered by Mom Nature.

It's simply too late for carbon "reduction" to make a difference. We've passed the point of no-return for this. We need carbon capture and sequestration.
classicplastic
1 / 5 (1) Aug 07, 2015
I'm a LOT smarter than you've are.

Yes..yes...you've are...NOT.

So, you were dropped also.


Again, put up or shut up. What are your SOLUTIONS? So, far, you've never offered even one.
axemaster
5 / 5 (2) Aug 09, 2015
In principle the CO2 ocean cycling could work, BUT:

- The process requires ENORMOUS ocean surface area. The quoted 1% of the ocean surface is approaching "beyond belief" levels of scale, especially for things you're building on the water.
- Some of the author's claims are problematic and seem to reflect a fundamental lack of understanding (not surprising given he only has a B.A. in Physics). For example, he claims as a benefit that the ocean surface will cool. This is actually a bad thing, because it will increase the rate of planetary thermal absorption!
- He claims "$1 billion minimum for full deployment". This is a joke, even the most cursory glance shows that the numbers will be far higher.
- I strongly suspect that this type of sequestering will not stop the ocean acidification problem.

That said: I agree that it would be very nice to actively sequester CO2. Without that it will be basically impossible to avoid civilization-altering climate change.

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