Less-lethal weapons get new interest amid police shootings

Less-lethal weapons get new interest amid police shootings
In this Thursday, July 30, 2015 photo, Salvatore Emma Jr., president and CEO of Micron Products, displays Blunt Impact Projectiles, one ready for use, left, and another after being fired during a test at the factory in Fitchburg, Mass. The projectiles utilize new technology developed by the company to provide law enforcement with less-lethal ammunition engineered to cushion and displace the force of impact, designed to cause pain and discomfort but not serious injury. The technology is part of a push to find ways for law enforcement to be able to use force with non-deadly means. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Less-lethal weapons are drawing new interest as a series of fatal police shootings have sparked outrage and protests around the country.

A company in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, makes blunt-impact projectiles that make people double over in pain, but do not cause lasting injuries.

Micron Products manufactures the projectiles, using technology patented by Security Devices International, a defense technology company.

They are among many companies marketing less-lethal weapons to .

Sixteen in the U.S. and six in Canada have bought the projectiles, including police departments in East Hartford, Connecticut; Sioux Falls, South Dakota; and Los Alamos, New Mexico.

  • Less-lethal weapons get new interest amid police shootings
    In this Thursday, July 30, 2015 photo, a launcher is displayed on a table next to cartridges that utilize 40mm Blunt Impact Projectiles at Micron Products, Inc., in Fitchburg, Mass. The projectiles utilize new technology developed by the company to provide law enforcement with less-lethal ammunition engineered to cushion and displace the force of impact, designed to cause pain and discomfort but not serious injury. The technology is part of a push to find ways for law enforcement to be able to use force with non-deadly means. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
  • Less-lethal weapons get new interest amid police shootings
    In this Thursday, July 30, 2015 photo a cartridge that utilizes a 40mm Blunt Impact Projectile, as well as marking powder, is displayed on a table at Micron Products, Inc., in Fitchburg, Mass. The projectiles utilize new technology developed by the company to provide law enforcement with less-lethal ammunition engineered to cushion and displace the force of impact, designed to cause pain and discomfort but not serious injury. The technology is part of a push to find ways for law enforcement to be able to use force with non-deadly means. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
  • Less-lethal weapons get new interest amid police shootings
    In this Thursday, July 30, 2015 photo, a 40mm Blunt Impact Projectile that releases green marking powder on impact is displayed after being fired at a test dummy at Micron Products, Inc., in Fitchburg, Mass. The projectiles utilize new technology developed by the company to provide law enforcement with less-lethal ammunition engineered to cushion and displace the force of impact, designed to cause pain and discomfort but not serious injury. The technology is part of a push to find ways for law enforcement to be able to use force with non-deadly means. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
  • Less-lethal weapons get new interest amid police shootings
    In this Thursday, July 30, 2015 photo, Chad Zrate, of Fitchburg, Mass., an engineering manager at Micron Products, Inc., prepares to demonstrate a launcher that fires a 40mm Blunt Impact Projectile, or PIB, at the manufacturing plant in Fitchburg. The projectiles utilize new technology developed by the company to provide law enforcement with less-lethal ammunition engineered to cushion and displace the force of impact, designed to cause pain and discomfort but not serious injury. The technology is part of a push to find ways for law enforcement to be able to use force with non-deadly means. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
  • Less-lethal weapons get new interest amid police shootings
    In this Thursday, July 30, 2015 photo, components of 40mm Blunt Impact Projectiles are displayed on a tray during a manufacturing process at Micron Products, Inc., in Fitchburg, Mass. The projectiles utilize new technology developed by the company to provide law enforcement with less-lethal ammunition engineered to cushion and displace the force of impact, designed to cause pain and discomfort but not serious injury. The technology is part of a push to find ways for law enforcement to be able to use force with non-deadly means. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
  • Less-lethal weapons get new interest amid police shootings
    In this Thursday, July 30, 2015 photo, Salvatore Emma Jr., president and CEO of Micron Products, displays Blunt Impact Projectiles, one ready for use, left, and another after being fired at the factory in Fitchburg, Mass. The projectiles utilize new technology developed by the company to provide law enforcement with less-lethal ammunition engineered to cushion and displace the force of impact, designed to cause pain and discomfort but not serious injury. The technology is part of a push to find ways for law enforcement to be able to use force with non-deadly means. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

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