How used coffee grounds could make some food more healthful

May 13, 2015, American Chemical Society

Coffee has gone from dietary foe to friend in recent years, partly due to the revelation that it's rich in antioxidants. Now even spent coffee-grounds are gaining attention for being chock-full of these compounds, which have potential health benefits. In ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers explain how to extract antioxidants from the grounds. They then determined just how concentrated the antioxidants are.

María-Paz de Peña and colleagues note that coffee—one of the most popular drinks in the world—is a rich source of a group of antioxidants called dietary phenolic compounds. Spent grounds, however, often end up in the trash. But recently, scientists have discovered that antioxidants aren't just in the brewed coffee; they're also in the used grounds. De Peña wanted to figure out the total phenolic content in extracts from these leftovers.

The researchers used three different methods to release from spent grounds and found high levels of phenols in the extracts—sometimes at higher levels than in brewed coffee. Thus, they have the potential to serve as additives to enhance the potential health effects of other , the scientists conclude.

Explore further: Used coffee grounds are a rich source of healthful antioxidants

More information: Assessment of Total (Free and Bound) Phenolic Compounds in Spent Coffee Extracts, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2015.

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