Scientists identify mechanism that accelerated the 2011 Japan earthquake

December 15, 2014, Stanford University

Stanford scientists have found evidence that sections of the fault responsible for the 9.0 magnitude Tohoku earthquake that devastated northern Japan in 2011 were relieving seismic stress at a gradually accelerating rate for years before the quake.

This "decoupling" process, in which the edges of two tectonic plates that are frictionally locked together slowly became unstuck, transferred stress to adjacent sections that were still locked. As a result, the quake, which was the most powerful ever recorded to hit Japan, may have occurred earlier than it might have otherwise, said Andreas Mavrommatis, a graduate student in Stanford's School of Earth Sciences.

Mavrommatis and his advisor, Paul Segall, a professor of geophysics at Stanford, reached their conclusions after analyzing 15 years' worth of GPS measurements from the Japanese island of Honshu. Their results were published earlier this year in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

"We looked at northeastern Japan, which has one of the densest and longest running high-precision GPS networks in the world," Mavrommatis said.

Segall said, "The measurements indicated the plate boundary was gradually becoming less locked over time. That was surprising."

The scientists will present their work, "Decadal-Scale Decoupling of the Japan Trench Prior to the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake from Geodetic and Repeating-Earthquake Observations," Dec. 17 at the American Geophysical Union's Fall Meeting in San Francisco. The talk will take place at 5 p.m. PT at the Moscone Convention Center in Moscone South, Room 306.

The pair's hypothesis is further supported by a recent analysis they conducted of so-called repeating earthquakes offshore of northern Honshu. The small quakes, which were typically magnitude 3 or 4, occurred along the entire length of the , but each one occurred at the same spot every few years. Furthermore, many of them were repeating not at a constant but an accelerating rate, the scientists found. This acceleration would be expected if the were becoming less locked over time, Mavrommatis said, because the decoupling process would have relieved pent-up stress along some sections of the fault but increased stress on adjacent sections.

"According to our model, the decoupling process would have had the effect of adding to the section of the fault that nucleated the Tohoku quake," Segall said. "We suspect this could have accelerated the occurrence of the earthquake."

The scientists caution that their results cannot be used to predict the occurrence of the next major earthquake in Japan, but it could shed light on the physical processes that operate on faults that generate the world's largest quakes.

Explore further: Some sections of the San Andreas Fault system in San Francisco Bay Area are locked, overdue

Related Stories

Geologists warn of mega quake for north Chile

August 14, 2014

North Chile is at risk of a mega earthquake after a tremor in April released only some of the tension building along a high-risk fault zone since 1877, researchers said Wednesday.

Recommended for you

Nanoscale Lamb wave-driven motors in nonliquid environments

March 19, 2019

Light driven movement is challenging in nonliquid environments as micro-sized objects can experience strong dry adhesion to contact surfaces and resist movement. In a recent study, Jinsheng Lu and co-workers at the College ...

OSIRIS-REx reveals asteroid Bennu has big surprises

March 19, 2019

A NASA spacecraft that will return a sample of a near-Earth asteroid named Bennu to Earth in 2023 made the first-ever close-up observations of particle plumes erupting from an asteroid's surface. Bennu also revealed itself ...

The powerful meteor that no one saw (except satellites)

March 19, 2019

At precisely 11:48 am on December 18, 2018, a large space rock heading straight for Earth at a speed of 19 miles per second exploded into a vast ball of fire as it entered the atmosphere, 15.9 miles above the Bering Sea.

Revealing the rules behind virus scaffold construction

March 19, 2019

A team of researchers including Northwestern Engineering faculty has expanded the understanding of how virus shells self-assemble, an important step toward developing techniques that use viruses as vehicles to deliver targeted ...

Levitating objects with light

March 19, 2019

Researchers at Caltech have designed a way to levitate and propel objects using only light, by creating specific nanoscale patterning on the objects' surfaces.

4 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

rocket77777
1 / 5 (2) Dec 15, 2014
If it was decoupling then chances are it is due to ice melting at pole and more water pressure thus lowering ocean plate.
katesisco
not rated yet Dec 15, 2014
This is way off but..................if the undersea earthquake could have reduced the magnetic field locally? permanently? If so, that would explain the car electronic products that do not work as expected.
I remember that St Malmo tidal currents were interfered with and the result was an actual slowing of the Earth's rotation. So perhaps an undersea quake this large could have disturbed the local magnetic field.
gkam
3 / 5 (2) Dec 17, 2014
kate, the earthquakes are much shallower than the liquid core which drives the magnetic field.
imido
Dec 17, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.