Geophysical Research Letters is a semi-monthly peer reviewed scientific journal published by the American Geophysical Union that was established in 1974. The editor-in-chief is Eric Calais (Purdue University). The stated purpose of Geophysical Research Letters is rapid publication of conscise research reports that may significantly influence one or more American Geophysical Union disciplines. These particular geoscience disciplines are atmospheric sciences, solid earth, space sciences, ocean sciences, hydrology, land surface processes, and the cryosphere. GRL also publishes twelve invited reviews that cover advances achieved during the past two or three years. The target readership is the earth science community, the broader scientific community, and the general public. This journal is indexed in the following databases: According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 3.505, ranking it 12th out of 165 journals in the category "Geosciences, Multidisciplinary". Geophysical Research Letters was also the 5th most cited publication on climate change between 1999 and 2009.

Publisher
American Geophysical Union
Country
United States
History
1974—present
Website
http://www.agu.org/journals/gl/index.shtml
Impact factor
3.505 (2010)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Researcher proposes sea-level rise global observing system

University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researcher Shane Elipot proposes a new approach to monitoring global sea-level rise. Using the existing NOAA Global Drifter Program array of roughly ...

Telecom transmitter masts can be used to predict rain

Rain showers are difficult to predict, as they usually develop into a downpour within half an hour, resulting in flooding. Much depends on being able to spot time, location and precipitation ahead of time on the radar. The ...

Atmospheric dust levels are rising in the Great Plains

Got any spaces left on that 2020 bingo card? Pencil in "another Dust Bowl in the Great Plains." A study from University of Utah researchers and their colleagues finds that atmospheric dust levels are rising across the Great ...

The deep sea is slowly warming

New research reveals temperatures in the deep sea fluctuate more than scientists previously thought and a warming trend is now detectable at the bottom of the ocean.

Proglacial lakes are accelerating glacier ice loss

Meltwater lakes that form at glacier margins cause ice to recede much further and faster compared to glaciers that terminate on land, according to a new study. But the effects of these glacial lakes are not represented in ...

Researchers gain new insights on river dynamics

A river's only consistent attribute is change. As the Greek philosopher Heraclitus remarked, "No man ever steps in the same river twice." Although this dynamic nature is often out of sight and mind, forgetting about it has ...

Flood risks: More accurate data due to COVID-19

Emerging use of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) makes it possible to continuously measure shallow changes in elevation of Earth surface. A study by the University of Bonn now shows that the quality of these measurements ...

page 1 from 50