Geophysical Research Letters is a semi-monthly peer reviewed scientific journal published by the American Geophysical Union that was established in 1974. The editor-in-chief is Eric Calais (Purdue University). The stated purpose of Geophysical Research Letters is rapid publication of conscise research reports that may significantly influence one or more American Geophysical Union disciplines. These particular geoscience disciplines are atmospheric sciences, solid earth, space sciences, ocean sciences, hydrology, land surface processes, and the cryosphere. GRL also publishes twelve invited reviews that cover advances achieved during the past two or three years. The target readership is the earth science community, the broader scientific community, and the general public. This journal is indexed in the following databases: According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 3.505, ranking it 12th out of 165 journals in the category "Geosciences, Multidisciplinary". Geophysical Research Letters was also the 5th most cited publication on climate change between 1999 and 2009.

Publisher
American Geophysical Union
Country
United States
History
1974—present
Website
http://www.agu.org/journals/gl/index.shtml
Impact factor
3.505 (2010)

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The Antarctic Peninsula is the northernmost part of Earth's coldest continent, making it particularly vulnerable to a changing global climate. Surface melting of snow and ice initiated the breakup of the peninsula's northernmost ...

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Metallic asteroids are thought to have started out as blobs of molten iron floating in space. As if that's not strange enough, scientists now think that as the metal cooled and solidified, volcanoes spewing liquid iron could ...

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By using underwater sonar, researchers have found that a glacier jutting into a freshwater lake in southern Chile looks different underwater compared to ocean-bound glaciers in Greenland. Their findings, published in the ...

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Chris Osburn is an associate professor of marine, earth and atmospheric sciences at NC State. His latest work, published in Geophysical Research Letters, looks at the effect that large, destructive storms – such as 2016's ...

Tracing the process of nitrous oxide formation in the ocean

Nitrogen is of fundamental importance for life on Earth. Depending on the forms and compounds in which it occurs, it can promote life, but also limit it. In addition, some nitrogen compounds, such as nitrous oxide, are extremely ...

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