Geophysical Research Letters is a semi-monthly peer reviewed scientific journal published by the American Geophysical Union that was established in 1974. The editor-in-chief is Eric Calais (Purdue University). The stated purpose of Geophysical Research Letters is rapid publication of conscise research reports that may significantly influence one or more American Geophysical Union disciplines. These particular geoscience disciplines are atmospheric sciences, solid earth, space sciences, ocean sciences, hydrology, land surface processes, and the cryosphere. GRL also publishes twelve invited reviews that cover advances achieved during the past two or three years. The target readership is the earth science community, the broader scientific community, and the general public. This journal is indexed in the following databases: According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 3.505, ranking it 12th out of 165 journals in the category "Geosciences, Multidisciplinary". Geophysical Research Letters was also the 5th most cited publication on climate change between 1999 and 2009.

Publisher
American Geophysical Union
Country
United States
History
1974—present
Website
http://www.agu.org/journals/gl/index.shtml
Impact factor
3.505 (2010)

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How and when was carbon distributed in the Earth?

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