Chemists create 'assembly-line' for organic molecules

Chemists create 'assembly-line' for organic molecules
The image shows a hypothetical molecular assembly line where reagents are effectively added to a growing carbon chain with extraordinary high fidelity and precision. By controlling the precise orientation of the building blocks added to the carbon chain, the conformation of the molecule can be controlled so that it adopts a helical (shown) or linear shape. Credit: Amber Webster, www.amberlwebster.com

(Phys.org) —Scientists at the University of Bristol have developed a process where reagents are added to a growing carbon chain with extraordinary high fidelity and precise orientation, thereby controlling the conformation of the molecule so that it adopts a helical or linear shape. The process can be likened to a molecular assembly line.

Nature has evolved highly sophisticated machinery for . One of the most beautiful examples is its machinery for the synthesis of polyketides, a very important class of molecules due to their broad spectrum of biological activities (for example antibiotic, antitumor, antifungal, antiparasitic).

In this process, a simple thioester (small building block) is passed from one enzyme domain to another, growing as it does so until the is formed. The process resembles a molecular assembly line.

The Bristol researchers sought to emulate nature in the construction of their own molecular assembly line through a related iterative process. But iterative processes are very challenging as each iteration must occur with >99.5 per cent efficiency, and >99.5 per cent stereocontrol otherwise mixtures would result.

In a paper published in the journal Nature today, the scientists report a reagent which reacts with their small building blocks (boronic esters) with exceptionally high fidelity and stereocontrol.

Through repeated iteration they have converted a simple building block into a complex molecule (a with ten contiguous methyl groups) with remarkably high precision over its length, its stereochemistry and therefore its shape.

Different stereoisomers were targeted and it was found that they adopted different shapes (helical/linear) according to their stereochemistry.

This work should now enable molecules with predictable shape to be rationally designed and created which could have an impact in all areas of molecular sciences where bespoke molecules are required.


Explore further

Building blocks of the future

More information: "Assembly-line synthesis of organic molecules with tailored shapes." Matthew Burns, et al. Nature 513, 183–188 (11 September 2014) DOI: 10.1038/nature13711 . Received 09 May 2014 Accepted 23 July 2014 Published online 10 September 2014
Journal information: Nature

Citation: Chemists create 'assembly-line' for organic molecules (2014, September 11) retrieved 15 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-09-chemists-assembly-line-molecules.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Sep 11, 2014
So, now we have two nano-manufacturing units announced?

http://www.applie...ano.html

Sep 11, 2014
Not in the Drexler sense, certainly. This isn't the first molecular assembly line we've emulated; we've been able to manufacture polyketides piece by piece by decades. This is just an improvement on how.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more