How tiny enzymes reign supreme in worldwide carbon recycling

The recycling of most of the carbon in nature depends on the breakdown of two polymers in woody matter, notably cellulose and lignin. In a paper just published in the journal Biochemistry, Richard Wolfenden, Ph.D., and colleague ...

Humanity's next test: feed 10 billion without ruining Earth

Experts Friday began negotiating the most comprehensive scientific assessment ever of the role the land we live off plays in climate change, expected to highlight the stark choices humanity faces to feed 10 billion people ...

Interstellar iron isn't missing, it's just hiding in plain sight

Astrophysicists know that iron (chemical symbol: Fe) is one of the most abundant elements in the universe, after lightweight elements such as hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen. Iron is most commonly found in gaseous form in stars ...

Eight ways to halt a global food crisis

There are serious challenges to global food supply everywhere we look. Intensive use of fertilisers in the US Midwest is causing nutrients to run off into rivers and streams, degrading the water quality and causing a Connecticut-size ...

Partial mycoheterotrophs: The green plants that feed on fungi

You probably learned this basic lesson of biology in elementary school: Plants are self-feeders. These so-called autotrophs use the sun's energy and water to turn carbon dioxide from the air into food through the process ...

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