NASA sees bursts of thunderstorms in Tropical Depression Genevieve's center

August 5, 2014 by Rob Gutro
This false-colored infrared image from NASA's Aqua satellite shows powerful thunderstorms (purple) re-developed around Genevieve's center on August 5 at 8:35 a.m. EDT. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at what's happening under Tropical Depression Genevieve's clouds using infrared light, and it appears that thunderstorms are bubbling up again.

A false-colored infrared image created at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena California used data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The AIRS data showed powerful re-developed around Genevieve's center on August 5 at 8:35 a.m. EDT. That's an indication that there's some punch left in the , and that punch could help it strengthen, according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC).

In the August 5 discussion about Genevieve, the CPHC noted "Genevieve has continued to present a bursting pattern during the overnight hours...with the low level circulation center estimated to be under the southeastern portion of an area of very cold cloud tops."

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) today, Tuesday, August 5, Genevieve's maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kph). The NOAA Central Pacific Hurricane Center notes that gradual strengthening is forecast today through Wednesday, and Genevieve may become a tropical storm later today.

The center of tropical depression Genevieve was located near latitude 11.1 north, longitude 171.1 west. That's about 1,120 miles (1,805 km) southwest of Honolulu, Hawaii and 400 miles (645 km) south-southwest of Johnston Island. The depression is moving toward the west-northwest near 14 mph (22 kph) and this motion is expected to continue today through Wednesday. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1005 millibars.

NOAA's CPHC calls for slow intensification over the next couple of days as the storm continues to track in a westerly direction. Genevieve is expected to cross the International Date Line in a couple of days and when it does the forecast management of the storm would covered by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

Explore further: NASA sees zombie Tropical Depression Genevieve reborn

Related Stories

NASA sees zombie Tropical Depression Genevieve reborn

July 30, 2014

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite helped confirm that the remnant low pressure area of former Tropical Storm Genevieve has become a Zombie storm, and has been reborn as a tropical depression on July 30.

NASA sees Genevieve squeezed between 3 tropical systems

July 31, 2014

The resurrected Tropical Depression Genevieve appears squeezed between three other developing areas of low pressure. Satellite data from NOAA and NASA continue to show a lot of tropical activity in the Eastern and Central ...

Tropical Storm Genevieve forms in Eastern Pacific

July 25, 2014

The seventh tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean formed and quickly ramped up to a tropical storm named "Genevieve." NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an infrared image of the newborn storm being trailed by ...

Recommended for you

Climate change made Harvey rainfall 15 percent more intense

December 14, 2017

A team of scientists from World Weather Attribution, including researchers from Rice University and other institutions in the United States and Europe, have found that human-caused climate change made the record rainfall ...

East Antarctic Ice Sheet has history of instability

December 13, 2017

The East Antarctic Ice Sheet locks away enough water to raise sea level an estimated 53 meters (174 feet), more than any other ice sheet on the planet. It's also thought to be among the most stable, not gaining or losing ...

Hydraulic fracturing negatively impacts infant health

December 13, 2017

From North Dakota to Ohio to Pennsylvania, hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, has transformed small towns into energy powerhouses. While some see the new energy boom as benefiting the local economy and decreasing ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.