Swedish city introduces payment by hand scanning

An international traveler scans in their hand on a US Customs and Border Protection fingerprint scanner at Dulles Airport on Feb
An international traveler scans in their hand on a US Customs and Border Protection fingerprint scanner at Dulles Airport on February 20, 2013

Hand scanning has become an alternative payment method for people in a city in southern Sweden, researchers at Lund University said Monday.

Vein scanning terminals have been installed in 15 shops and restaurants in Lund thanks to an engineering student who came up with the idea two years ago while waiting in line to pay.

Some 1,600 people have signed up already for the system, which its creator says is not only faster but also safer than traditional payment methods.

"Every individual's is completely unique, so there really is no way of committing fraud with this system," researcher Fredrik Leifland said in a statement.

"You always need your hand scanned for a payment to go through."

While vein scanning technology existed previously, it has not been used as a form of payment before.

"We had to connect all the players ourselves, which was quite complex: the vein scanning terminals, the banks, the stores and the customers," Leifland added.

The creators have plans to further expand the business and other companies around the world are already starting to implement the new method.

To sign up users have to visit a shop or restaurant with a terminal, where they scan their palm three times and enter their social security and telephone numbers.

A is then sent to their mobile phone with an activation link to a website, with payments taken directly from customers bank accounts twice a month.


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Citation: Swedish city introduces payment by hand scanning (2014, April 14) retrieved 24 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-04-swedish-city-payment-scanning.html
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Apr 16, 2014
"so there really is no way of committing fraud with this system"
Really? What about storing the scan data from a user and then using it to get his money. If it's widespread enough, criminals couls set up a shop where they do just this.

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