Harvesting electricity from the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide

A new method for producing electricity from carbon dioxide could be the start of a classic trash-to-treasure story for the troublesome greenhouse gas, scientists are reporting. Described in an article in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters, the method uses CO2 from electric power plant and other smokestacks as the raw material for making electricity.

Bert Hamelers, Ph.D., and colleagues explain that electric power-generating stations worldwide release about 12 billion tons of CO2 annually from combustion of coal, oil and natural gas. Home and commercial heating produces another 11 billion tons. Smokestack gas from a typical coal-fired plant contains about 10 percent CO2, which not only goes to waste, but is a key contributor to global warming. Hamelers' team sought a way to change that trash into a treasure.

They describe technology that would react the CO2 with water or other liquids and, with further processing, produce a flow of electrons that make up electric current. It could produce about 1,570 kilowatts of additional electricity annually if used to harvest CO2 from power plants, industry and residences. That's about 400 times the annual electrical output of the Hoover Dam. Like that dam and other hydroelectric power facilities, that massive additional amount of would be produced without adding more CO2 to the atmosphere, Hamelers pointed out.


Explore further

Nanomaterial to help reduce CO2 emissions

More information: DOI: 10.1021/ez4000059
Citation: Harvesting electricity from the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (2013, July 23) retrieved 15 December 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-07-harvesting-electricity-greenhouse-gas-carbon.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments