US appeals panel speaks well of Google book plans

May 8, 2013

A federal appeals panel in Manhattan has expressed support for Google Inc.'s plan to create the world's largest digital library.

Three judges on the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Wednesday spoke positively about the benefits the plan would provide the world.

The panel is considering an appeal by Mountain View, Calif.-based Google of a judge's decision on class certification of authors in a lawsuit brought by the Authors Guild.

The guild is seeking $750 in damages for each copyrighted book Google copied. It says Google is not making "fair use" of copyrighted material by offering snippets of works. Google has defended its library, now more than 20 million books, saying it is fully compliant with copyright law.

Explore further: Judge refuses to delay NY case for Google appeal

Related Stories

Judge refuses to delay NY case for Google appeal

August 29, 2012

(AP)—The federal judge presiding over challenges to Google Inc.'s plans to create the world's largest digital library has refused to delay the 7-year-old case while Google appeals his decision to grant authors class certification.

Federal judge delays Google case pending appeal

September 17, 2012

(AP)—A federal appeals judge in New York has agreed to delay a court challenge to Google Inc.'s plans to create the world's largest digital library while the court considers whether authors should receive class status.

Google given more time to reach book settlement

June 1, 2011

A US judge on Wednesday allowed Google and US authors and publishers more time to seek a new settlement over the Internet giant's plan to create a massive online library and bookstore.

NY suit vs. Google seeks damages for pictures, art

April 8, 2010

(AP) -- Groups representing photographers and artists on Wednesday accused Internet search leader Google of copyright infringement in a lawsuit that mirrors complaints book publishers and authors have made for years about ...

Google, publishers shelve book-scanning suit (Update 2)

October 4, 2012

(AP)—Google and major book publishers have settled a lengthy legal battle over digital copyrights, but a bigger dispute still looms with thousands of authors who allege that Google is illegally profiting from their works.

Recommended for you

Researchers find tweeting in cities lower than expected

February 20, 2018

Studying data from Twitter, University of Illinois researchers found that less people tweet per capita from larger cities than in smaller ones, indicating an unexpected trend that has implications in understanding urban pace ...

Augmented reality takes 3-D printing to next level

February 20, 2018

Cornell researchers are taking 3-D printing and 3-D modeling to a new level by using augmented reality (AR) to allow designers to design in physical space while a robotic arm rapidly prints the work.

What do you get when you cross an airplane with a submarine?

February 15, 2018

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed the first unmanned, fixed-wing aircraft that is capable of traveling both through the air and under the water – transitioning repeatedly between sky and sea. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.