Tapping into the rubber plant genome

A group of international scientists have sequenced the draft genome sequence of the rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis, the major commercial source of natural rubber. The manuscript describing the draft genome is published in BMC Genomics.

Scientists have sequenced the draft genome sequence of the rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis, the major commercial source of natural rubber. Rubber is an indispensible commodity that is used in manufacture worldwide, billions dollar industry. The plant has played a vital role in the world economy since 1876. Currently Asia accounts for about 93% of global supply of rubber.

The manuscript describing the draft genome is published in . The team identify around 12.7% of the almost 70,000 genes as unique, and outline those associated with rubber biosynthesis, rubber wood formation, and allergenicity.

The rubber industry is affected by rubber blight – a – and natural rubber allergenicity, a global medical concern for those repeatedly exposed to latex-containing products (e.g., gloves).

Ahmad Yamin Rahman and colleagues believe that this draft genome information will accelerate the development of high-yielding natural rubber plants. This will lead to assistance in latex production, wood development, disease resistance and allergenicity.


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More information: www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/14/75/abstract
Journal information: BMC Genomics

Source: ResearchSEA
Citation: Tapping into the rubber plant genome (2013, February 7) retrieved 20 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-02-rubber-genome.html
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