Io's volcanism controls Jupiter's magnetospheric activity

Io
Io, the most volcanic body in the solar system, is seen in front of Jupiter's cloudy atmosphere in this image from NASA's Galileo spacecraft, now orbiting the giant planet. Credit: NASA

Jupiter's volcanic moon Io spews out volcanic gas, which reaches its atmosphere and becomes ionized, forming what is known as the Io plasma torus. This plasma torus can interact with Jupiter's magnetosphere, possibly affecting auroral activity there.

To help determine whether Io's affects Jupiter's magnetosphere, Yoneda et al. analyzed ground-based observations of Jupiter's sodium nebula, which provides an indication of Io's volcanic activity and plasma content in the Io plasma torus, along with satellite-based measurements of called HOM emission, which is a sign of Jupiter's auroral activity.

They observe that Jupiter's sodium nebula was enhanced in late May through early June 2007, indicating that Io's volcanic activity increased during that period. The researchers observe that shortly after this enhancement began, Jupiter's HOM emission intensity decreased.

As a result, the authors conclude that increased volcanic activity on Io lessens auroral activity in Jupiter's magnetosphere.


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More information: Io's volcanism controls Jupiter's radio emissions, Geophysical Research Letters, doi: 10.1002/grl.50095, 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/grl.50095/abstract
Journal information: Geophysical Research Letters

Citation: Io's volcanism controls Jupiter's magnetospheric activity (2013, January 28) retrieved 20 June 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-01-io-volcanism-jupiter-magnetospheric.html
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Jan 28, 2013
I can't wait to hear cantdrive's explanation of this one.

Jan 28, 2013
Well, it shows there is a connection, a circuit, mind you. And being Io's "volcanic" activity is actually a plasma focus discharge, etching the surface, it shouldn't be surprising to see above average particles if more of the current is being directed at the moon.

Jan 29, 2013
CD85, don't just respond to the title, actually read the article. Note that when the volcanoes blow, the Jupiter aurora DECREASES.

Jan 29, 2013
Filamentation of Volcanic Plumes on the Jovian Satellite Io, A. L. Peratt and A. J. Dessler, Astrophys. Space Sci. 144, pp. 451-461, 1988 (1M).

http://public.lan...sler.pdf

Plasma gun present.

Jan 29, 2013
Your overlords aren't providing you with the answer, so you're just going to avoid the subject. I was really hoping you were going to go solo on this one and come up with your own original idea.

Jan 30, 2013
Filamentation of Volcanic Plumes on the Jovian Satellite Io, A. L. Peratt and A. J. Dessler, Astrophys. Space Sci. 144, pp. 451-461, 1988 (1M).

http://public.lan...sler.pdf

Plasma gun present.


Plasma....not.

The material being ejected comes from inside the moon. The mechanism for the eruption may very well be as Alfven describes it in your paper, in fact it has alot of merit. But it is still a volcanic eruption.

Your statement in all it's surety is still an opinion, there is NO evidence that would falsify the EDM process causing the "volcanoes". In fact, the observations of Prometheus' migration of 85km to the west supports the EDM theory. There is no legitimate explanation of moving volcanoes in the "standard theory". BTW, in Io's environment, all of the "dust and gas" behave as if it is a plasma, so yes, plasma is.

http://phys.org/n...ory.html

Jan 30, 2013
Your assertion that "standard theory" doesn't have a legitimate explanation is pure bullshit. In the case of the Hawaiian islands, a tectonic plate is moving over the top of a hotspot. In other cases, so much material accumulates over the top of a vent that the lava has an easier time moving up a side channel, or an earthquake makes a new fault that the lava can flow into, etc., etc.. And plasma no. Images reveal a classic, gravity dominated fountain.

Jan 30, 2013
Your example of the Hawaiian Islands isn't comparable at all, it's taken millions of years (supposedly) to create said island chain. Prometheus has moved 85km since 1979.

Jan 30, 2013
Woo. On a moon with surface gravity only 18% of Earths, with no atmosphere, with tides 100 meters tall in solid rock, with unusually hot lava of low viscosity, and you'd like volcanism to occur exactly as it does on Earth. And I note that while I mentioned (a by no means exhaustive) list of mechanisms, you reply to only one. Does us all a favor - simply link to the scientific literature wherein it is demonstrated, proven, or even suggested that an Io volcano can't move 85 km in a few decades. It must occur somewhere, because you'd never invent a scientific factoid out of whole cloth, right?

Jan 31, 2013
There is no legitimate explanation of moving volcanoes in the "standard theory".


Once again, your confusion here is simply a matter of ignorance. Here is a fairly simple paper which explains the nature of how EVERYTHING on the surface of Io moves around:

http://skywalker....ject.htm

Io doesn't have a crust like Earth does. It is just barely solid on the surface with raging seas of magma just underneath. The surface moves around so much that it always takes time to find and identify features between observations. The surface of Io moves up and down as much as 330 feet as a result of tides. Ocean tides here on earth max out at 16 feet. Your moving volcano mystery has been solved by basic facts.

Jan 31, 2013
BTW, in Io's environment, all of the "dust and gas" behave as if it is a plasma, so yes, plasma is


The dust and gas near Io's surface are actually gas and dust. Io is a very cold place except for the volcanos. Just like Earth, Io's upper atmosphere ionizes due mainly to UV light from the sun. Io's lower atmosphere, just like Earth's, is not ionized.

The physics of Jupiter's magnetic field have been studied in detail for decades. You should read up on it more, since you seem to be interested in this topic. Jupiter is probably a good analog for exoplanets of similar type, so it is the target of a lot of attention, which means there's lots of data about it.

Even though Jupiter's magnetic field is relatively strong, it is still orders of magnitude weaker than the strength you imagine. We study it constantly, so we actually know quite a bit about it. There is plasma there, and we understand it quite well. You should read up on it. The way it really works is cool.

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