Google launches online 'Cultural Institute' chronicling 20th century

October 10, 2012
Google on Wednesday launched its online "Cultural Institute", a digital visual archive of landmark 20th century events and personalities, created in cooperation with 17 museums and institutes from across the globe. The archives focus on legends like Anne Frank, the young Jewish-Dutch Holocaust victim whose famous diary chronicled her plight.

Google on Wednesday launched its online "Cultural Institute", a digital visual archive of landmark 20th century events and personalities, created in cooperation with 17 museums and institutes from across the globe.

The archives focus on legends like Anne Frank, the young Jewish-Dutch Holocaust victim whose famous diary chronicled her plight; South African freedom icon Nelson Mandela; as well as lesser-known heroes like Jan Karski, a Polish anti-Nazi partisan who brought the Allies early eye-witness testimony of the Holocaust.

Six million archive photographs, documents, texts and films provided by museums including the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Poland, Israel's Yad Vashem World Centre for Holocaust Research or the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory can be accessed at the Cultural Institute at www.google.com/culturalinstitute.

"We want to bring all of the that we have—the services, the products, mapping—to the cultural sector," Google's Mark Yoshitaka told journalists in the Polish capital Warsaw at the Wednesday launch.

With an initial collection of 42 online themes, the archive is set to expand significantly in the coming years, he said.

"It's a fantastic tool, which lets us cross geographic borders, provide access to museum collection around the clock in several languages. It's a real revolution," said Robert Kostro director of the Museum of Polish History.

"Today, we must use all technologies at our disposal to preserve memory," Piotr Cywinski, director of the Auschwitz-Birkenau State said at the launch.

Google's virtual Cultural Institute comes on the heels of the Google Art Project allowing Internet users to explore fine art from around the world with thousands of artworks photographed in extremely high resolution.

Explore further: Mandela's vast personal archives brought online

Related Stories

Mandela's vast personal archives brought online

March 27, 2012

Thousands of handwritten documents, photographs and videos of Nelson Mandela have been digitised and placed online Tuesday in a massive archive of the life of South Africa's first black president.

US Holocaust museum to put records online

May 3, 2011

The US Holocaust museum has teamed up with Internet genealogy site Ancestry.com to provide online information about those who were persecuted by the Nazis, the museum said.

Auschwitz memorial launches Facebook page

October 15, 2009

(AP) -- The memorial museum at Auschwitz has launched a Facebook page, hoping that the popular social networking site will help it reach young people around the globe and engage them in discussions about the former Nazi ...

Google Art Project premieres upgrades in Chicago

April 3, 2012

(AP) -- High technology merged with high culture Tuesday at The Art Institute of Chicago when Google Inc. announced an upgrade to its Google Art Project initiative, adding thousands of works in dozens more countries.

Recommended for you

Meteorite source in asteroid belt not a single debris field

February 17, 2019

A new study published online in Meteoritics and Planetary Science finds that our most common meteorites, those known as L chondrites, come from at least two different debris fields in the asteroid belt. The belt contains ...

Diagnosing 'art acne' in Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings

February 17, 2019

Even Georgia O'Keeffe noticed the pin-sized blisters bubbling on the surface of her paintings. For decades, conservationists and scholars assumed these tiny protrusions were grains of sand, kicked up from the New Mexico desert ...

Archaeologists discover Incan tomb in Peru

February 16, 2019

Peruvian archaeologists discovered an Incan tomb in the north of the country where an elite member of the pre-Columbian empire was buried, one of the investigators announced Friday.

Where is the universe hiding its missing mass?

February 15, 2019

Astronomers have spent decades looking for something that sounds like it would be hard to miss: about a third of the "normal" matter in the Universe. New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory may have helped them ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.