Cisco elevates 2 execs to president role

October 4, 2012 by Peter Svensson

(AP)—Cisco Systems Inc. hasn't had a president since CEO John Chambers gave up the title in 2006. Now, as the San Jose, Calif., company thinks about a successor to the long-serving CEO, it's appointing two presidents—twice the number most companies have.

The maker of computer networking gear says Rob Lloyd, formerly the executive vice president in charge of worldwide sales, is now a president in charge of both product development and sales.

Meanwhile Chief Operating Officer Gary Moore, who had to make do with the title of executive vice president, is now a president, too.

Chuck Robbins, formerly the for Americas sales, takes over Lloyd's job as global sales head.

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