Brazil resumes work on major dam after protests

Amazonic natives protest the Belo Monte Dam project
A handout picture released by Amazon Watch shows Amazonic natives symbolically occupying an earthen dam in Brazil in protest against the construction of the massive Belo Monte Dam project in June 2012. Work has resumed on the damn after the public consortium reached a deal with indigenous groups and fishermen who had occupied one of its building sites.

Work has resumed on the massive Belo Monte Dam in Brazil's Amazon after the public consortium reached a deal with indigenous groups and fishermen who had occupied one of its building sites.

State media reported Thursday that Norte Energia, the consortium building the , had reached a deal with the 150 protesters who had occupied Pimentel, one of five , on October 8.

The protesters had accused the consortium of failing to live up to promises made in June to build schools, homes and a hospital.

They also want their lands demarcated and non-indigenous people removed, as well as a better healthcare system and access to drinking water.

Xingu Vivo, an NGO representing local indigenous groups, said Thursday's agreement had addressed some of the protesters' demands but that other matters would have to be worked out in future negotiations.

fear the dam across the Xingu River, a tributary of the , will harm their way of life, while environmentalists have warned of deforestation, and damage to the local ecosystem.

Expected to produce 11,000 megawatts of electricity, the dam would be the third biggest in the world, after China's Three Gorges facility and Brazil's Itaipu Dam in the south.

It is one of several hydroelectric projects billed by Brazil as providing clean energy for a fast-growing economy.

The dam is, however, expected to flood an area of 500 square kilometers (200 square miles) along the Xingu and displace 16,000 people, according to the government, although some NGOs put the number at 40,000 displaced.

The federal government plans to invest a total of $1.2 billion to assist the displaced by the time the dam is completed in 2019.


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Citation: Brazil resumes work on major dam after protests (2012, October 19) retrieved 15 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-10-brazil-resumes-major-protests.html
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Oct 20, 2012
Glass beads for Manhattan...

And, in the end, I'm sure the idigenous people and fisherman will only get the sketchiest versions of what they were promised --where they get anything at all-- and big changes will be made to the ecosystem in this area of the Amazon Basin by the upriver impoundment of the water and sediment, and the downriver loss of river volume and nutrients, not to mention the sudden hard boundaries placed on the ranges of the many species of life that make the river and adjacent territory their home.


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