Biology and management of the green stink bug

Biology and management of the green stink bug
This shows green stink bug, A. hilare, adults. Normal green coloration is shown in (A) and the atypical orange coloration is shown in (B). Credit: K. Kamminga

The green stink bug is one of the most damaging native stink bug species in the United States. Stink bugs feeding on cotton, soybeans, tomatoes, peaches, and other crops can result in cosmetic damage as well as reduced quality and yield.

A new article in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management, "Biology and Management of the Green Stink Bug," offers farmers and growers advice on how to deal with this .

According to the authors, stink bugs have become a major challenge to systems because control options are basically limited to the application of broad-spectrum insecticides such as organophosphates, carbamates, and pyrethroids. However, neonicotinoids are generally effective for control of this stink bug and may be less disruptive to its .

Further options for stink bug management that are being explored include the use of trap crops and enhancing beneficial parasitoid populations. Cultural options, including trap cropping and the planting of resistant varieties, have been documented as decreasing crop injury by stink bugs. In addition, there are multiple natural enemies that reduce population numbers.

The authors go on to describe the green 's life cycle, seasonal biology, host plants, and management options such as pheromone trapping, chemical control, cultural control, and biological control.


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More information: esa.publisher.ingentaconnect.c … 03/00000003/art00006
Citation: Biology and management of the green stink bug (2012, September 26) retrieved 22 May 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-09-biology-green-bug.html
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