Football: Goal-line technology trial in Danish league - FIFA

May 16, 2012

One of two goal-line technology systems being tested for FIFA's rules body is to be used at two Danish league matches in the coming week, the world governing body said on Wednesday.

The GoalRef system, developed by Germany's Fraunhofer IIS, will be used on Sunday in the Superligaen game between Silkeborg IF and SonderjyskE and next Wednesday, when FC Nordsjaelland take on AC Horsens.

GoalRef uses a chip placed in the centre of a football which will be picked up by sensors installed in the goalmouth.

The second system under consideration is developed by British firm Hawk-Eye. It uses six cameras at each end of a stadium to calculate a three-dimensional position of the ball.

With each system, the referee will be alerted by a signal transmitted to a wristwatch within one second of any goalmouth incident whether the ball has crossed the line.

Hawk-Eye is being tested on Wednesday evening in Southampton, on England's south coast, in the final of the local Hampshire county's amateur league cup.

Software developed by Hawk-Eye, which tracks the trajectory of the ball, is already used to determine disputed line calls in tennis and some leg before wicket referrals in cricket.

FIFA said in a statement that the match referees in the three test matches will not use the technology in the event of a disupted goal. Instead, the systems will be monitored by observers.

Goal-line technology has been trialled before at the under-17 World Cup in Peru in 2005 and at the FIFA Club World Cup in Japan in 2007.

But after years of debate, pressure is growing to introduce the technology throughout the game, after a number of high-profile refereeing controversies.

FIFA's rules body -- the International Association Board (IFAB) -- is expected to give the thumbs up to goal-line at a meeting in Kiev in July following the European Championships.

Explore further: Anger as FIFA rejects goal-line technology

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