Voice analysis aims to spot phone scams

Nagoya University researchers and Fujitsu Ltd. have developed technology they say can analyze suspicious phone conversations and detect bank transfer scams with a high degree of accuracy.

The technology detects what the researchers call the "overtrust" condition, in which a person believes the information given by a based on the victim's voice pitch and tone. If this technology is installed on phones and successfully warns targets, it is expected to help prevent bank transfer scams.

Kazuya Takeda, a professor, and other researchers at the university focused on the fact that a person's pitch and tone becomes flat in the high-frequency range when he or she is overwhelmed with distressing information. This often results in a diminished capacity to evaluate information - a situation called overtrust, the researchers said.

Perpetrators of phone scams often pretend to be victims' relatives, saying distressing things like "I'm in trouble," or "I was involved in a crime."

The researchers detected overtrust with 90 percent accuracy in tests in which they examined 50 simulated phone-scam conversations using the technology.

The research group said it would be possible to detect phone-scam conversations by simultaneously analyzing keywords often used by criminals, such as "debt" or "compensation."


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(c)2012 The Yomiuri Shimbun (Tokyo)
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Citation: Voice analysis aims to spot phone scams (2012, March 28) retrieved 28 October 2020 from https://phys.org/news/2012-03-voice-analysis-aims-scams.html
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