Britain allows student's extradition to US over website

March 13, 2012
Sheffield student, Richard O'Dwyer, arrives at Westminster Magistrates Court in central London in January 2012. Britain has authorised the extradition to the United States of a student who created a website allowing people to watch films and television shows for free, the interior ministry said on Tuesday.

Britain has authorised the extradition to the United States of a student who created a website allowing people to watch films and television shows for free, the interior ministry said on Tuesday.

Richard O'Dwyer, a 23-year-old student at Sheffield Hallam University in , allegedly earned tens of thousands of pounds (dollars) through advertising on the TVShack website before it was closed down by US authorities.

A British judge ruled in January that O'Dwyer could be extradited to the US to answer allegations.

A spokeswoman for Britain's interior ministry, the Home Office, said on Tuesday that the government had found "no statutory bars to his surrender".

"On March 9 the Home Secretary, having carefully considered all relevant matters, signed an order for Richard O'Dwyer's to the US," she said.

O'Dwyer's mother Julia said her son was being "sold down the river" by the British government.

"If Richard appears to have committed a crime in this country, then try him in this country," she said.

The student would be the first British citizen extradited for such an offence. He faces jail if found guilty of the charges, which were brought after a crackdown by the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency.

His lawyer had argued in court that the website did not store copyright material itself and merely directed users to other sites, making it similar to .

The lawyer also argued that his client was being used as a "" for copyright law in the United States.

The court heard that after O'Dwyer was arrested in London in November 2010, he admitted to police that he owned TVShack.net and TVShack.cc and earned about £15,000 (18,000 euros, $23,500) a month from online advertising.

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5 comments

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Vendicar_Decarian
Mar 13, 2012
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
kaasinees
1 / 5 (2) Mar 13, 2012
Actually its the other way around, still :)
physyD
2 / 5 (4) Mar 14, 2012
Am I reading this correctly? Does this imply or set a precedent that it is now legal to now extradite a citizen for doing things in their own country what is classified by other countries as crime, whether or not it is a crime in that country? For example, if someone in Britain is part of Falun Gong, that China may request extradition to them to be punished?
Kinedryl
1 / 5 (1) Mar 14, 2012
OK, but he should be tortured at least a bit, if not jailed...
kaasinees
1 / 5 (2) Mar 14, 2012
Am I reading this correctly? Does this imply or set a precedent that it is now legal to now extradite a citizen for doing things in their own country what is classified by other countries as crime, whether or not it is a crime in that country? For example, if someone in Britain is part of Falun Gong, that China may request extradition to them to be punished?

Yes, there is a name for this treaty but i forgot how it is called, interpol or something like that?
Yep i googled and it is interpol, dont forget USA and UK are NATO/WTO members. We stopped being countries a long time ago, we are all states/nations now.

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