US warns of mobile radio band bottleneck

The US seeks to avoid bottlenecks in crowded global mobile radio spectrums
A woman checks her cellphone at CES on January 9 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The United States seeks to avoid bottlenecks in crowded global mobile radio spectrums, the head of a US delegation to the World Radiocommunication Conference said.

The United States seeks to avoid bottlenecks in crowded global mobile radio spectrums, the head of a US delegation to the World Radiocommunication Conference said here Monday.

"We believe that to avoid the crowded mobile crunch we need to look at every band possible," Decker Anstrom told a press briefing on the opening day of the WRC.

The conference faces a "very challenging agenda" that included broadband issues, Anstrom said, adding that the US delegation was keen to work towards a global solution that would allow to flourish.

Philip Verweer, the US coordinator for international communications and information policy, said the WRC would focus on "assets" where cooperation among nations was essential.

That made the conference, which is held approximately every four years "extraordinarily important," Verweer added.

Global radio experts who met ahead of the WRC have already approved new radio standards as they prepared a new mobile phone to replace third generation or 3G technology.

The newly-adopted "IMT Advanced Spectrum" should result in faster and better quality , experts said.


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(c) 2012 AFP

Citation: US warns of mobile radio band bottleneck (2012, January 23) retrieved 19 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-01-mobile-radio-band-bottleneck.html
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