Demonstration of ultra-high speed piezoelectric thin film with nanodomain structure

December 22, 2011, National Institute for Materials Science

The Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, the National Institute for Materials Science, and Kyoto University confirmed for the first time in the world that it is possible to achieve ultra-high speed switching in a time of 200 nanoseconds with a new piezoelectric thin film which possesses micro regions called “nanodomains.” The new material is expected to enable higher speeds in operation changes (switching).

Piezoelectric utilize the property of structural change in response to electrical signals, and are used as a power source for micro devices (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems, MEMS) in ink jet printers. However, switching time cannot be adequately controlled with the current generation of piezoelectric thin films. If it is possible to realize high speed switching, expansion to industrial applications and development of higher performance products can be expected.

Therefore, using the high brightness synchrotron radiation of ’s large-scale facility SPring-8, this research group investigated the nanodomain structural changes that occur when an electrical field is applied at high speed to a ferroelectric thin film, which is one type of piezoelectric. As a result, the group succeeded in confirming for the first time in the world that the nanodomain crystal orientation of this thin film changes in a time of 2/10 millionths of a second, or 200 nanoseconds (200 ns).

This result, which showed the possibility of controlling piezoelectric thin films at the nanosecond order of 200ns, will make a major contribution to the development of high performance products by realizing higher speeds in MEMS using piezoelectric thin films. As examples, in ink jet printers, achievement of higher treatment speeds in MEMS, which control ink coating, will enable fine printing with a smaller quantity of ink than the conventional technology, and in automotive engines, higher MEMS speeds can be expected to contribute to improved fuel economy and reduced exhaust gas by application of nanodomain structures to ceramic parts which control fuel use efficiency.

This work was published on November 4 in Applied Physics Letters and has also been newly selected as a noteworthy paper in the Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science and Technology.

Explore further: Modern ceramics help advance technology

Related Stories

Modern ceramics help advance technology

May 8, 2008

Many important electronic devices used by people today would be impossible without the use of ceramics. A new study published in the Journal of the American Ceramic Society illustrates the use of ceramic materials in the ...

Giant piezoelectric effect to improve MEMS devices

December 2, 2011

Researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Materials Research Institute at Penn State are part of a multidisciplinary team of researchers from universities and national laboratories across ...

Nanotechnology pushes battery life to eternity

June 21, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- A simple tap from your finger may be enough to charge your portable device thanks to a discovery made at RMIT University and Australian National University.

Piezoelectric film used for new remote that twists and bends

September 25, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Murata Manufacturing Co. is using high-transparency organic piezoelectric film for its two new devices, a remote control that works by bending and twisting, and a touch-pressure pad that connects to PCs. ...

Lead-free piezoelectric materials of the future

September 14, 2010

Piezoelectric materials have fantastic properties: squeeze them and they generate an electrical field. And vice-versa, they contract or expand when jolted with an electrical pulse. With a name derived from the Greek word ...

Recommended for you

The powerful meteor that no one saw (except satellites)

March 19, 2019

At precisely 11:48 am on December 18, 2018, a large space rock heading straight for Earth at a speed of 19 miles per second exploded into a vast ball of fire as it entered the atmosphere, 15.9 miles above the Bering Sea.

Revealing the rules behind virus scaffold construction

March 19, 2019

A team of researchers including Northwestern Engineering faculty has expanded the understanding of how virus shells self-assemble, an important step toward developing techniques that use viruses as vehicles to deliver targeted ...

OSIRIS-REx reveals asteroid Bennu has big surprises

March 19, 2019

A NASA spacecraft that will return a sample of a near-Earth asteroid named Bennu to Earth in 2023 made the first-ever close-up observations of particle plumes erupting from an asteroid's surface. Bennu also revealed itself ...

Nanoscale Lamb wave-driven motors in nonliquid environments

March 19, 2019

Light driven movement is challenging in nonliquid environments as micro-sized objects can experience strong dry adhesion to contact surfaces and resist movement. In a recent study, Jinsheng Lu and co-workers at the College ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.