US Cellular: We turned down iPhone

November 4, 2011 By PETER SVENSSON , AP Technology Writer

(AP) -- U.S. Cellular, the country's sixth-largest cellphone company, says it had the opportunity to carry the iPhone but turned it down because the phone is too expensive.

Consumers pay $200 for the base model of the 4S, but Apple charges carriers about $600 for it. Carriers count on making their money back in service fees over the life of the contract.

CEO Mary Dillon told analysts on an earnings conference call Friday that "the terms were unacceptable from a risk and profitability standpoint."

AT&T was the exclusive U.S. carrier for Apple Inc.'s phone for three and a half years, until Verizon Wireless got it in February. In October, it was followed by Sprint Nextel Corp. Now, tiny Mississippi-based carrier C Spire Wireless is set to add it too.

Explore further: Tiny US phone company is getting iPhone

0 shares

Related Stories

Tiny US phone company is getting iPhone

October 19, 2011

(AP) -- Apple Inc. said Tuesday that C Spire Wireless, the country's eighth-largest phone company, will start selling the iPhone 4S in a few weeks.

Report says Sprint to get iPhone in October

August 23, 2011

(AP) -- Sprint Nextel Corp., the country's third-largest cellphone company, will start selling the iPhone in mid-October, The Wall Street Journal said Tuesday.

A buyer's guide to the new iPhone 4S

October 5, 2011

(AP) -- Apple is trotting out a new iPhone on Oct. 14, but it's not the iPhone 5 some were expecting. Instead, it's a more modest upgrade, the iPhone 4S. Here are some facts to help you decide if it's time to make the plunge.

Recommended for you

Renewable energy has robust future in much of Africa: study

March 27, 2017

As Africa gears up for a tripling of electricity demand by 2030, a new Berkeley study maps out a viable strategy for developing wind and solar power while simultaneously reducing the continent's reliance on fossil fuels and ...

WikiLeaks releases CIA hacks of Apple Mac computers

March 23, 2017

The Central Intelligence Agency is able to permanently infect an Apple Mac computer so that even reinstalling the operating system will not erase the bug, according to documents published Thursday by WikiLeaks.

Protecting web users' privacy

March 23, 2017

Most website visits these days entail a database query—to look up airline flights, for example, or to find the fastest driving route between two addresses.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.