Taiwan's HTC unveils Windows 'Mango' handsets

October 12, 2011

Taiwan's leading smartphone maker HTC on Wednesday unveiled its first mobile phones using Microsoft's much-anticipated software platform "Mango" after Apple launched its latest iPhone.

The two handsets -- "Titan" and "Radar" -- will become the first mobile phones launched by to run on "Mango".

"Titan" will be equipped with a 4.7-inch touch screen and two cameras, including an 8.0 megapixel lense on the rear and a 1.3 megapixel front lense while "Radar" will carry a 3.8-inch screen and a 5.0 megapixel camera.

"Titan" is scheduled to hit the local market late this month and "Radar" next month, with a price tag of Tw$18,900 ($619.67) and Tw$13,900 ($455.74) respectively.

Models pose with the latest HTC smartphone "Titan" and "Radar" (right) during a news conference in Taipei on October 12. Taiwan's leading smartphone maker unveiled its first mobile phones using Microsoft's much-anticipated software platform "Mango" after Apple launched its latest iPhone.

Microsoft unveiled Mango in May, promising it will be available by year's end for free to existing 7 customers and will ship on new phones from Samsung, LG and HTC and new partners Acer, Fujitsu and ZTE.

Mango-powered phones are facing competition from Apple's iPhone4S and the cellphones running Google's Android software.

Explore further: HTC Titan's a Mango monster: 4.7-inch Windows phone

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