Google plots Hurricane Irene with online map

Land Crewman Christopher Bird pulls a sail boat out of the water
Land Crewman Christopher Bird pulls a sail boat out of the water at Martha's Vineyard Shipyard in Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts, as Hurricane Irene moves up the US east coast. Internet giant Google has rolled out an online map tracking the path of Hurricane Irene and providing other useful information about the storm headed for the US east coast.

Internet giant Google has rolled out an online map tracking the path of Hurricane Irene and providing other useful information about the storm headed for the US east coast.

The map, located at crisislanding.appspot.com, is a product of the Google Crisis Response team, which provides online tools to help with relief efforts following .

The map displays three- to five-day forecasts for Hurricane Irene, shows evacuation routes and which coastal areas of the eastern United States are in danger of facing a storm surge.

Besides maps, online tools developed by include the "," which attempts to locate and reunite victims of earthquakes or other disasters.

Millions of Americans are bracing for Irene, a Category Two hurricane packing 105-mile (165-kilometer) winds, which is expected to slam into North Carolina on Saturday before heading north toward New York.

Hurricanes are rare on the US eastern seaboard, home to more than 65 million people living in a string of densely populated cities from Washington to New York to Boston.


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(c) 2011 AFP

Citation: Google plots Hurricane Irene with online map (2011, August 26) retrieved 16 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-08-google-plots-hurricane-irene-online.html
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