IMF identifies hacked computer files

The International Monetary Fund has identified the computer files hacked in a cyberattack
The logo of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) at the organization's headquarters in Washington, DC in May 2011. The International Monetary Fund has identified the computer files hacked in a cyberattack and is the process of weighing their importance, and IMF spokesman said Thursday.

The International Monetary Fund has identified the computer files hacked in a cyberattack and is the process of weighing their importance, and IMF spokesman said Thursday.

"We're still investigating this breach. We have identified files that have been copied and we're assessing the importance of those files," spokesman David Hawley said in a news briefing.

"However, we have no evidence that information held in our emails, our financial systems or the Fund's document management system have been compromised and that is where things stand at the moment."

The 187-nation institution oversees the global financial system and provides loans to medium- and high-income member countries. The Washington-based Fund is a key hub of on economic and financial activities.

Hawley declined to identify which files were copied.

"We're assessing that issue precisely as we speak so that I've got nothing further on that," he told a reporter.

"The source (of the attack) is a matter of investigation."

The IMF, the CIA, the US government and businesses such as Sony and have been the recent targets of cyberattacks.


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Citation: IMF identifies hacked computer files (2011, June 23) retrieved 22 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-06-imf-hacked.html
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