Magnetic fields in interstellar clouds

Magnetic Fields in Interstellar Clouds
The Flame Nebula seen in infrared light. New far infrared observations of molecular gas motions around a young stellar core in this nebula support models in which magnetic fields play a key role. Credit: 2MASS, UMass, and IPAC

(PhysOrg.com) -- Magnetic fields play an important role in the formation and evolution of stars, as they stretch around a hot medium like a rubber band and help to determine the flow of material onto or away from the star.

One key uncertainty is the amount of energy in the as compared with the energy in turbulent motions of the gas. Unfortunately, magnetic fields are poorly understood, in part because they are very difficult to measure directly.

Observations during the past few years have dramatically improved our ability to detect and study magnetic fields in star-forming clouds. Former CfA postdoc Hua-bai Li and CfA astronomers Ray Blundell, Abigail Hedden, Scott Paine, and Edward Tong, together with a colleague, used a new instrument working at far from a Chilean mountaintop to study the effects of magnetic fields.

This CfA Receiver Lab Telescope observed the emission from warm gas with a velocity resolution able to categorize turbulent motions in the gas.

The scientists found evidence of magnetic fields in the around a young stellar core by examining the distribution of velocities of the gas: magnetic fields should constrain gas motions, and the team was able to measure the extent of this influence as they probed the region around the core.

Additional evidence for magnetic fields comes from the shape of the cloud core, which appears to be elongated rather than spherical (an asymmetrical shape is expected if magnetic fields are constraining the medium).

The new results represent an important advance both in measuring the effects of magnetic fields, and in supporting of their influence on the birth of new stars.


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Magnetic fields play larger role in star formation than previously thought

Citation: Magnetic fields in interstellar clouds (2011, March 25) retrieved 17 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-03-magnetic-fields-interstellar-clouds.html
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Mar 25, 2011
If stars form on the collapsed cores of earlier stars - pulsars - then the strong magnetic field of the pulsar may appear to play a role in the formation of new stars.

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Former NASA Principal
Investigator for Apollo

LKD
Mar 25, 2011
Not enough people will read this article... Sigh.

Mar 25, 2011
I expected to see some of the "Electric Universe" proponents holding forth about the relative merits of this research...

Mar 26, 2011
Re the EU: well, the magnetic fields discussed in this article have to be generated by something. I would imagine that something would be electricity moving through plasma, kinda obviously. And that jives with the EU interpretation, doesn't it?

Mar 27, 2011
PlasmaVision of the Universe-1993 and Plasma regulated Electromagnetic Unverse [1995] -my books highlight the importance for Space Science to progress. Cosmos Yoga Vision series identify Magnetic Links from Galactic Plane to Heart and Centerof Universe- identified at 100,000 LY from Milky way.One can see Andromeda in flower modes- see uplink modes in my projections.http://cosmology_definition.rediffblogs.com
and http://cosmologyt...pot.com/
Vidyardhi Nanduri

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