Interactive tableware stimulates senses through light, sound vibration

Interactive tableware stimulates senses through light, sound vibration
Xabi Gutiérrez of Laboratorio Arzak is preparing barbecued lemons with prawns and patchouli and monk fish low tide on the ‘eye of the beholder’ platter. Credit: Philips Design

Philips Design and Laboratorio Arzak have continued their collaboration "multi-sensorial gastronomy" and will show their latest work at the 9th international gastronomy summit, madridfusion, 25 – 27 January 2011, in the form of interactive tableware that stimulate the senses through light, sound vibration and electrical current. Since the release of the first series of interactive plates at madridfusión 2010 the collaboration has looked at ways of altering the perception and enjoyment of food and drink by subtly stimulating adjacent senses at the same time.

The concepts challenge our associations of images and sounds with the sensations of hot, cold, sticky, dense, liquid, etc. Taste and the sensations triggered in the dining experience can be altered, expanding the repertoire of culinary stimuli and extending the experience of fine dining into a new dimension.

Clive van Heerden, Senior Director Design-led innovation at Philips Design: “Last year Arzak and Philips Design introduced three bone china concepts which are designed to light-up when food is placed on the plate or liquid is poured into the bowl. With the new generation of tableware we touch the senses not only via light, but also via sound vibration and electrical current.”

The ‘eye of the beholder’ platter concept is a piece of interactive tableware designed for two or more people to eat from. A crystalline substructure changes appearance with moving images – evocative of fire, ice, water, etc. – which are designed to contrast or compliment the dishes served on the platter. Very sensitive temperature monitoring and an array of motion sensors responsive to the utensils and the food make the dining experience playful and surprising. Color, imagery and movement affect the appreciation of individual food items. The platter responds to a series of utensils that stimulate the lips and tongue in subtle ways.

During the show, Arzak will show a prototype of a plate they created out of a PhotoFrame.


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Provided by Philips Electronics
Citation: Interactive tableware stimulates senses through light, sound vibration (2011, February 3) retrieved 21 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-02-interactive-tableware-vibration.html
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Feb 03, 2011
Eating with an electrozapping private massager, just what we need.

Of course, this kind of utensils is a good excuse to triple the prices at the local ultra-snobbish cuisine joint.

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