Ohio zoo acquires daughter of late longest snake

November 25, 2010

(AP) -- An Ohio zoo says a new resident has big snakeskin shoes to fill.

Weeks after announcing the death of the longest snake in captivity, the Columbus and Aquarium said Wednesday it has acquired the python's smaller daughter.

The 24-foot, 18-year-old snake named Fluffy died Oct. 27 of an apparent tumor. The zoo's new snake is 12 years old, and 6 feet shorter than her mother.

The zoo says in a statement that the daughter arrived Tuesday from the same private breeder who sold Fluffy to the zoo in 2007.

Fluffy was about the length of a moving van and had held the as the longest snake living in captivity. She also drew large crowds.

The zoo says it plans to ask the public to help name the new .

Explore further: Washed-up sea snake rescued in New Zealand

More information: On the Net: columbuszoo.org

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