Internet access to return to flights, says Lufthansa

The German carrier first offered onboard Internet access in 2003 but withdrew it three years later for reasons of cost
An airplane of German carrier Lufthansa is seen on the runway at Frankfurt Airport. The airline says it will offer Internet access on nearly its entire network by the end of next year, beginning with some flights to North America.

The leading German airline, Lufthansa, said Tuesday that it will offer Internet access on nearly its entire network by the end of next year, beginning with some flights to North America.

From Wednesday, "Lufthansa will be the first airline to offer its customers broadband on intercontinental routes," a statement said.

The German carrier first offered the service in January 2003 but withdrew it three years later for reasons of cost.

The new system, dubbed "FlyNet" and developed by Panasonic of Japan with Deutsche Telekom, will provide unlimited access to passengers with a or for 10.95 euros (14.21 dollars) or 3,500 frequent flier miles per hour.

A 24-hour connection will be available for 19.95 euros or 7,000 miles.

The service will be free however on FlyNet-equipped aircraft until January 31, 2011 the airline said.


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(c) 2010 AFP

Citation: Internet access to return to flights, says Lufthansa (2010, November 30) retrieved 24 September 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2010-11-internet-access-flights-lufthansa.html
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