Developing enzymes to clean up pollution by explosives

October 9, 2009

Scientists at the University of York have uncovered the structure of an unusual enzyme which can be used to reverse the contamination of land by explosives.

The discovery, by scientists in the York Laboratory and the Centre for Novel Agricultural Products, will support the development of plants that can help tackle pollution caused by royal demolition explosive, also known as RDX.

Researchers at York have identified bacteria that use RDX as a food source and used that knowledge to develop transgenic plants that can draw pollutants out of the soil and break them down.

The latest findings, published in the , focus on the XplA enzyme which plays an important role in that process.

Dr Gideon Grogan, from the York Structural Biology Laboratory, said: "The biological process for tackling the pollution caused by RDX already exists but we need to find ways of making it work faster and on the scale required.

"This research significantly improves our understanding of the structure of this enzyme and is therefore an important step towards exploiting its unusual properties."

Professor Neil Bruce, from the Centre for Novel Agricultural Products, said: "RDX is toxic and a possible carcinogen so it is important to identify ways of stopping it polluting land and water supplies.

"We have already had significant success in engineering plants that can perform this task and this research will help further refine that technique."

More information: The research 'The 1.5 Ĺ structure of XplA-heme, an unusual cytochrome-P450 heme domain that catalyses reductive biotransformation of royal demolition explosive (RDX)' can be read in full at: www.jbc.org/content/early/2009 … M109.031559.abstract

Source: University of York

Explore further: Researchers develop pollution-busting plants to clean up contaminated land

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