Too much YouTube? Lock it up

February 18, 2009 By Etan Horowitz

We all love to waste time at work checking out a YouTube video or updating our Facebook profiles, but if you can't control yourself, there's keepmeout.com, a free service that lets you set limits on your Web browsing.

1. Go to keepmeout.com and enter the address of a site you want to make sure you aren't visiting too much. Then decide when you want to be warned that you are visiting too often (i.e., when you visit more than three times in 60 minutes) and fill out the time field. Click "Submit."

2. You will now see a new URL that contains the name of the site you entered toward the end of it. Bookmark this URL in your browser and click on it to go to your time-wasting site instead of using the real address. Name your bookmark "Facebook" or "YouTube" so you forget that it's a special keepmeout.com link.

3. The first time you use the bookmark to visit your site, you won't notice any difference, but when you attempt to visit your site more often than you have allotted, you will see a warning page with a suggestion to visit your site again in a certain amount of time.

4. You can create multiple bookmarks for all of your favorite time-wasting sites.

5. If you really need to visit your favorite time-wasting site, you can always just type in the real address in your browser. When you create a bookmark, you can also uncheck the box next to "Don't link to the Web site on the warning page." Doing so will display a link to your favorite site when you see the warning.

___

(Etan Horowitz is the technology columnist for the Orlando Sentinel. He can be reached at ehorowitz(at)orlandosentinel.com.)

___

(c) 2009, The Orlando Sentinel (Fla.).
Visit the Sentinel on the World Wide Web at www.orlandosentinel.com/
Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

Explore further: Pinterest CEO sees site's future in its 'catalog of ideas'

Related Stories

Review: Firefox 1.5

December 1, 2005

Who says free software is worthless? Last year the developers at Mozilla took on the aging Internet standard, Microsoft's Internet Explorer, and had an instant hit on their hands with Firefox 1.0. A large reason for this ...

Opening the door to Europe's archives

November 21, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- Historical archives can be difficult to search, especially when relevant documents are held by institutions in different countries. A European project has shown how a single online portal with a simple graphical ...

Recommended for you

Scientists write 'traps' for light with tiny ink droplets

October 23, 2017

A microscopic 'pen' that is able to write structures small enough to trap and harness light using a commercially available printing technique could be used for sensing, biotechnology, lasers, and studying the interaction ...

When words, structured data are placed on single canvas

October 22, 2017

If "ugh" is your favorite word to describe entering, amending and correcting data on the rows and columns on spreadsheets you are not alone. Coda, a new name in the document business, feels it's time for a change. This is ...

Enhancing solar power with diatoms

October 20, 2017

Diatoms, a kind of algae that reproduces prodigiously, have been called "the jewels of the sea" for their ability to manipulate light. Now, researchers hope to harness that property to boost solar technology.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.