Sony Now Shipping 50GB Dual Layer Blu-Ray Disc in the U.S.

December 4, 2006

Sony Electronics has begun U.S. shipments of 50GB dual layer Blu-ray Disc recordable (write-once) media with AccuCORE technology.

The company also confirmed that it plans to start shipping 50GB dual layer rewritable BD media later this year.

“The arrival of 50GB Blu-ray Disc media is an important milestone in the evolution of this new format,” said Mike Lucas, director of marketing for Sony Electronics’ Media and Application Solutions Division. “The capacity represents more than four hours of HD quality video, at a 24 Mbps transfer rate, allowing users to take full advantage of Sony’s Blu-ray Disc burners and VAIO desktop and notebook computers.”

Lucas said that Sony’s AccuCORE technology has been re-engineered for Blu-ray Disc media, with its major benefits including scratch guard, archival reliability to prevent data/image corruption and deterioration, stable writing that reduces fluctuation as the disc spins, and temperature durability to prevent warping during severe changes in temperature and humidity.

Sony’s 50GB dual layer recordable disc has a suggested retail price of around $48.

Source: Sony

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