Honey, I shrunk the carbon nanotubes

November 14, 2006

U.S. scientists say they have developed a method of controllably altering the diameter of individual carbon nanotubes.

Alex Zettl and colleagues at the University of California, Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory say carbon nanotubes' ability to conduct electricity and other electrical and mechanical properties depends heavily on their size. However, current methods for making CNTs cannot reliably control nanotube diameter, making it more difficult to fabricate devices from nanotubes.

"We have developed a method to shrink individual nanotubes to any desired diameter," the researchers report. "The process can be repeated in a highly controlled fashion, yielding a high-quality CNT of any pre-selected and precise diameter."

The method, involving a high-temperature that shrinks regular-sized CNTs and reforms them into high-quality tubes of a smaller diameter, is to be detailed in the Dec. 13 issue of the journal Nano Letters.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Another way to search for biosignatures of alien life—the material blasted out of asteroid impacts

Related Stories

Single-celled architects inspire new nanotechnology

July 16, 2018

Diatoms are tiny, unicellular creatures, inhabiting oceans, lakes, rivers, and soils. Through their respiration, they produce close to a quarter of the oxygen on earth, nearly as much as the world's tropical forests. In addition ...

Hydrogen from water in iron nanotruss structures

July 18, 2018

Swedish researchers have discovered a new and efficient way to use electrocatalysis to produce hydrogen gas from water. Instead of using expensive and difficult-to-obtain platinum electrodes, the new method uses electrodes ...

Study forecasts growth rates of loblolly pine trees

July 12, 2018

The ability to predict weather patterns has helped us make clothing choices and travel plans, and even saved lives. Now, researchers in Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment are using similar predictive ...

Recommended for you

Study sheds light on—and through—2-D materials

September 24, 2018

The ability of metallic or semiconducting materials to absorb, reflect and act upon light is of primary importance to scientists developing optoelectronics—electronic devices that interact with light to perform tasks. Rice ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.