Spy software used in call centers

October 18, 2006

Forrester Research of Cambridge, Mass., said sales of "emotion detection" technology to corporate call centers has reached $400 million annually.

Forrester said sales are still growing for the systems and a related technology known as "speech analytics," The Washington Post reported Wednesday.

The technologies, which were originally developed for eavesdropping, have been employed by customer service agents to get a better idea of customers' moods.

Donna Fluss, principal with DMG Consulting LLC in West Orange, N.J., said emotion detection, which tracks volume and pitch, grew out of voice verification technology.

Fluss said both emotion detection and speech analytics use recorded and transcribed conversations to sort them by searchable words and phrases.

Health insurer Wisconsin Physicians Service, for example, uses the technology to scan automated phone calls for "Medicare" and "confused" to find calls from seniors with Medicare questions.

Roger Woolley, vice president of marketing for speech analytic software seller eTalk, of Irving, Texas, said subtler systems are used to identify when an angry customer is preparing to cancel services.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: How artificial intelligence will transform how we gesture

Related Stories

How artificial intelligence will transform how we gesture

February 20, 2018

"Over the last decade, machine learning, which is part of artificial intelligence (AI), has given us self-driving cars, practical speech recognition, effective web search, and a vastly improved understanding of the human ...

UK unveils new technology to fight extremist content online

February 13, 2018

The British government is unveiling new technology designed to remove extremist material from social media, amid mounting pressure on companies like Facebook and Twitter to do more to remove such content from their platforms.

Patent talk: Apple looks at voice assistance in whispers

December 16, 2017

(Tech Xplore)—Tell us another one. If you are at all like the rest of us, you wish the Siri-caller conversation could just stop, because you are working in the next cubicle or trying to read and re-read a paragraph in a ...

Recommended for you

Researchers find tweeting in cities lower than expected

February 20, 2018

Studying data from Twitter, University of Illinois researchers found that less people tweet per capita from larger cities than in smaller ones, indicating an unexpected trend that has implications in understanding urban pace ...

Augmented reality takes 3-D printing to next level

February 20, 2018

Cornell researchers are taking 3-D printing and 3-D modeling to a new level by using augmented reality (AR) to allow designers to design in physical space while a robotic arm rapidly prints the work.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.