The nano-guitar string that plays itself

Scientists at Lancaster University and the University of Oxford have created a nano-electronic circuit which vibrates without any external force.

How to move against the current? One answer is 'tilt'-illating

Going upstream, and against a current, involves a front-first downward tilt and then moving along a surface, shows new research by a team of scientists, which created "nano-motors" to uncover this effective means of locomotion ...

Mathematics at the speed of light

AMOLF researchers and their collaborators from the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC/CUNY) in New York have created a nanostructured surface capable of performing on-the-fly mathematical operations on an input image. ...

Excitons will shape the future of electronic devices

Excitons are quasiparticles made from the excited state of electrons and—according to research being carried out EPFL—have the potential to boost the energy efficiency of our everyday devices.

Suspended layers make a special superconductor

In superconducting materials, an electric current will flow without any resistance. There are quite a few practical applications of this phenomenon; however, many fundamental questions remain as yet unanswered. Associate ...

Microrobots clean up radioactive waste

According to some experts, nuclear power holds great promise for meeting the world's growing energy demands without generating greenhouse gases. But scientists need to find a way to remove radioactive isotopes, both from ...

An artificial sunflower that bends toward the sun

A team of researchers from the University of California and Arizona State University has found a way to create a material that demonstrates tropistic behavior. In their paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, ...

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