Nature, first published on 4 November 1869, is ranked the world s most cited interdisciplinary scientific journal by the Science Edition of the 2010 Journal Citation Reports. Most scientific journals are now highly specialized, and Nature is among the few journals (the other weekly journals Science and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences are also prominent examples) that still publish original research articles across a wide range of scientific fields. There are many fields of scientific research in which important new advances and original research are published as either articles or letters in Nature. Research scientists are the primary audience for the journal, but summaries and accompanying articles are intended to make many of the most important papers understandable to scientists in other fields and the educated general public. Towards the front of each issue are editorials, news and feature articles on issues of general interest to scientists, including current affairs, science funding, business, scientific ethics and research breakthroughs. There are also sections on books and arts.

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Website
http://www.nature.com/nmeth/index.html
Impact factor
20.717 (2010)

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New method to untangle 3D cancer genome

Northwestern Medicine scientists have invented a new method for resolving rearranged chromosomes and their 3D structures in cancer cells, which can reveal key gene regulators that lead to the development of tumors, published ...

New method to analyze nucleosomes

Northwestern Medicine scientists have developed a new method to analyze the protein composition of intact nucleosomes without losing combinatorial information present in chromatin. The technique, called Nuc-MS, could help ...

Artificial intelligence makes great microscopes better than ever

To observe the swift neuronal signals in a fish brain, scientists have started to use a technique called light-field microscopy, which makes it possible to image such fast biological processes in 3D. But the images are often ...

Individual receptors caught in the act of coupling

A new imaging technique developed by scientists at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital captures movies of receptors on the surface of living cells in unprecedented ...

Speeding up sequence alignment across the tree of life

A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institutes of Developmental Biology in Tübingen and the Max Planck Computing and Data Facility in Garching develops new search capabilities that will allow to compare the biochemical ...

New method could democratize deep learning-enhanced microscopy

Deep learning is a potential tool for scientists to glean more detail from low-resolution images in microscopy, but it's often difficult to gather enough baseline data to train computers in the process. Now, a new method ...

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