Lab on a Chip is a peer-reviewed scientific journal which publishes original (primary) research and review articles on any aspect of miniaturisation at the micro and nano scale. Lab on a Chip is published monthly by the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) and the editor-in-chief is Harp Minhas. The journal was established in 2001 and hosts other RSC publications: Highlights in Chemical Technology and Highlights in Chemical Biology. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 6.260. Lab on a Chip publishes research at the micro- and nano-scale across a variety of disciplines including chemistry, biology, bioengineering, physics, electronics, clinical science, chemical engineering, and materials science. Lab on a Chip publishes full research papers, technical notes, urgent communications, critical and tutorial reviews, and mini-reviews.

Publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
Country
United Kingdom
History
2001-present
Website
http://www.rsc.org/Publishing/Journals/lc/index.asp
Impact factor
6.260 (2010)

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