Lab on a Chip is a peer-reviewed scientific journal which publishes original (primary) research and review articles on any aspect of miniaturisation at the micro and nano scale. Lab on a Chip is published monthly by the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) and the editor-in-chief is Harp Minhas. The journal was established in 2001 and hosts other RSC publications: Highlights in Chemical Technology and Highlights in Chemical Biology. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 6.260. Lab on a Chip publishes research at the micro- and nano-scale across a variety of disciplines including chemistry, biology, bioengineering, physics, electronics, clinical science, chemical engineering, and materials science. Lab on a Chip publishes full research papers, technical notes, urgent communications, critical and tutorial reviews, and mini-reviews.

Publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
Country
United Kingdom
History
2001-present
Website
http://www.rsc.org/Publishing/Journals/lc/index.asp
Impact factor
6.260 (2010)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Flexible color displays with microfluidics

A new study published on Microsystems and Nanoengineering by Kazuhiro Kobayashi and Hiroaki Onoe details the development of a flexible and reflective multicolor display system that does not require continued energy supply ...

Scientists use 3D printing to make artificial blood vessels

The tangled highway of blood vessels that twists and turns inside our bodies, delivering essential nutrients and disposing of hazardous waste to keep our organs working properly has been a conundrum for scientists trying ...

Light-activated skeletal muscle engineered (w/ Video)

Many robotic designs take nature as their muse: sticking to walls like geckos, swimming through water like tuna, sprinting across terrain like cheetahs. Such designs borrow properties from nature, using engineered materials ...

Simple device monitors health using sweat

A device that monitors health conditions in the body using a person's sweat has been developed by Penn State and Xiangtan University researchers, according to Huanyu "Larry" Cheng, assistant professor of engineering science ...

Inexpensive, portable detector identifies pathogens in minutes

Most viral test kits rely on labor- and time-intensive laboratory preparation and analysis techniques; for example, tests for the novel coronavirus can take days to detect the virus from nasal swabs. Now, researchers have ...

page 1 from 12