Developmental Cell is a broad-spectrum journal that covers the fields of cell biology and developmental biology. It publishes research reports describing novel results of unusual significance in all areas of these two fields, and at the interface between them. Each issue also contains review articles tailored to the journal's broad readership. With this wide coverage, Developmental Cell is a unique cross-disciplinary resource for researchers in both these fields, and for the general scientific community.

Publisher
Cell Press
Website
http://www.cell.com/developmental-cell/

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Cell polarity: An aurora over the pole

Even before the fertilised egg or zygote can start dividing into daughter cells that form the future tissues and organs during the development of a multicellular organism, the symmetrical zygote needs to become asymmetrical ...

Rules of inheritance rewritten in worms

The idea that children inherit half of their DNA from each parent is a central tenet of modern genetics. But a team led by KAUST's Christian Frøkjær-Jensen has re-engineered this heredity pattern in roundworms, a commonly ...

How plants cope with iron deficiency

Iron is an essential nutrient for plants, animals and also for humans. It is needed for a diverse range of metabolic processes, for example, for photosynthesis and for respiration. If a person is lacking iron, this leads ...

Researchers uncover intracellular longevity pathway

The search for clues on how to live healthier, longer lives has led researchers at Baylor College of Medicine to look inside the cells of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans. The researchers report in the journal Developmental ...

Plant peptide helps roots to branch out in the right places

How do plants space out their roots? A Japanese research team has identified a peptide and its receptor that help lateral roots to grow with the right spacing. The findings were published on December 20, 2018 in the online ...

Regulating the rapidly developing fruit fly

From birth, it takes humans almost two decades to reach adulthood; for a fruit fly, it takes only about 10 days. During a fly embryo's initial stages of development, the insect looks different from minute to minute, and its ...

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