Developmental Cell is a broad-spectrum journal that covers the fields of cell biology and developmental biology. It publishes research reports describing novel results of unusual significance in all areas of these two fields, and at the interface between them. Each issue also contains review articles tailored to the journal's broad readership. With this wide coverage, Developmental Cell is a unique cross-disciplinary resource for researchers in both these fields, and for the general scientific community.

Publisher
Cell Press
Website
http://www.cell.com/developmental-cell/

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Driving myelination by actin disassembly

(Phys.org)—If a metallurgist wanted to determine how a blade was made they might cut a small cross section, mount, polish, and etch it, and then look at it under a microscope. They could probably tell right away whether ...

Scientists discover how tissue tension controls cell division

During cell division, a parent cell divides into two daughter cells. Their new role and function depend on the orientation of the division plane. A crucial factor guiding this division orientation is the shape of the mother ...

The sweet spot of flagellar assembly

To build the machinery that enables bacteria to swim, over 50 proteins have to be assembled according to a logical and well-defined order to form the flagellum, the cellular equivalent of an offshore engine of a boat. To ...

Embryos taking shape via buckling

The embryo of an animal first looks like a hollow sphere. Invaginations then appear at different stages of development, which will give rise to the body's structures (the brain, digestive tract, etc.). According to a hypothesis ...

Cells communicate by doing the 'wave'

Cells work around the clock to deliver, maintain, and control every aspect of life. And just as with humans, communication is a key to their success.

Protein linked to cancer acts as a viscous glue in cell division

An over-abundance of the protein PRC1, which is essential to cell division, is a telltale sign in many cancer types, including prostate, ovarian, and breast cancer. New research, published online today in Developmental Cell, ...

page 1 from 19