The global invasion routes of the red swamp crayfish

Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) researchers have reconstructed the invasion routes followed by the red swamp crayfish during its human-driven expansion based on the analysis of a mitochondrial gene (COI), which was ...

Frog fungus fights back

Amphibian populations have been declining around the world for more than 40 years. One culprit is the fungus B. dendrobatidis, which causes the disease chytridiomycosis.

New whistle alerts bats to steer clear of wind turbines

Wind turbines are a critical component in the strategy for energy independence, but these massive structures are also killing bats. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates that the more than 52,000 wind turbines operating in ...

Bumps on peacock spider make dark spots super-dark

A team of researchers with members from Harvard University, the University of Bonn, the University of Denmark and Yale University has identified bumps on the abdomens of male peacock spiders that make their dark-colored patches ...

Researching the kingfisher's hydrodynamic design

Renowned for their noiseless dive, the kingfisher's iconic beak-shape has inspired the design of high speed bullet trains. Now scientists have tested beak-shape among some of the birds' 114 species found world-wide, to assess ...

Tiger sharks revealed as lazy predators

One of the ocean's most feared predators – the tiger shark—has been revealed as a relaxed and sometimes lazy hunter by scientists studying their behaviour.

The contrasting fortunes of the planet's greatest apes

Many eloquent commentators have waxed lyrical about their first encounter with mountain gorillas—most notably Sir David Attenborough, vice-president of Fauna & Flora International (FFI) since 1979, the same year that those ...

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