In search of an undersea kelp forest's missing nitrogen

Plants need nutrients to grow. So scientists were surprised to learn that giant kelp maintains its impressive growth rates year-round, even in summer and early fall when ocean currents along the California coast stop delivering ...

How the dragon got its frill

The frilled dragon exhibits a distinctive large erectile ruff. This lizard usually keeps the frill folded back against its body, but can spread it as a spectacular display to scare off predators. Researchers at the University ...

Ant farmers boost plant nutrition

Humans began cultivating crops about 12,000 years ago. Ants have been at it rather longer. Leafcutter ants, the best-known insect farmers, belong to a lineage of insects that have been running fungus farms based on chopped-up ...

Destructive insect outbreaks and cod collapse

When fundamental changes started to happen in three ecosystems in North America, people reacted: They completely stopped pollution, forestry and fishing. But these measures were futile; it was impossible to bring the ecosystems ...

Measuring human impact on coastal ecosystems

Lush seagrass beds that support marine life, store carbon and prevent coastal erosion are on the decline due to such things as farming, aquaculture and coastal development.

Ruminants' genes are a treasure trove

A new large-scaled research project has mapped the genome of 44 ruminant species - a group of animals that have intrigued researchers for years because of their biological diversity and their huge importance as domestic animals. ...

Why plants don't die from cancer

Chernobyl has become a byword for catastrophe. The 1986 nuclear disaster, recently brought back into the public eye by the hugely popular TV show of the same name, caused thousands of cancers, turned a once populous area ...

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