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Mathematics news

Topology looks for the patterns inside big data

Big data gets much attention from media, industry and government. Companies and labs generate massive amounts of data associated with everything from weather to cell phone usage to medical records, and each data set may involve hundreds of variables. ...

dateMay 18, 2015 in Mathematics
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Game intelligence can be learned

New theories on game intelligence could change the world of team sports forever. Game intelligence is not necessarily something you are born with but something you can learn, according to the authors of the ...

dateMay 13, 2015 in Mathematics
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Ants' movements hide mathematical patterns

When ants go exploring in search of food they end up choosing collective routes that fit statistical distributions of probability. This has been demonstrated by a team of mathematicians after analysing the ...

dateMay 12, 2015 in Mathematics
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Is the universe a hologram?

Describing the universe requires fewer dimensions than we might think. New calculations show that this may not just be a mathematical trick, but a fundamental feature of space itself.

dateApr 27, 2015 in Mathematics
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New statistics methods for dose finding studies

Less than 0.02 per cent of potential active ingredients pass clinical tests and become commercially viable. However, it is possible that some candidates are rejected without good reason, suspects mathematician ...

dateApr 21, 2015 in Mathematics
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Using Twitter to probe political polarization

We'd like to believe that our opinions are nuanced, balanced, high-minded, wise and above all, unique, but alas they are not—or so says Twitter. Most often, those we engage with on the popular social media ...

dateMar 31, 2015 in Mathematics
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Mathematicians solve 60-year-old problem

A team of researchers, led by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute professor Yuri Lvov, has found an elegant explanation for the long-standing Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) problem, first proposed in 1953, investigated ...

dateMar 23, 2015 in Mathematics
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On Pi Day, how scientists use this number

If you like numbers, you will love March 14, 2015. When written as a numerical date, it's 3/14/15, corresponding to the first six digits of pi (3.1415)—a once-in-a-century coincidence! Pi Day, which would ...

dateMar 13, 2015 in Mathematics
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Professor takes madness out of the month

With the NCAA Men's and Women's Basketballl Tournaments tipping off soon, brackets and bubble-busters are reaching a fever pitch. Dr. Jay Coleman, the Richard deRaismes Kip Professor of Operations Management and Quantitative ...

How big data can be used to understand major events

With the most unpredictable UK general election looming in modern times, how can big data be used to understand how elections are covered by the media? New research has for the first time analysed over 130,000 ...

Geometry's least-packable shapes

If you've ever struggled to pack a bunch of suitcases into the trunk of your car, you've got some idea of a basic problem in materials science: if you throw a bunch of atoms or molecules together, how do ...

A formula for predicting innovation

By the time she was six years old, Nadya Bliss had already figured out her professional calling. She knew that one day she would be a mathematician.

Study reveals inner workings of cricket teams

Do batsmen put personal glory before their team? A study by QUT researchers found cricket batsmen who were close to reaching personal milestones were likely to alter their strategy in a way which, at first ...

Origami—mathematics in creasing

Origami is the ancient Japanese art of paper folding. One uncut square of paper can, in the hands of an origami artist, be folded into a bird, a frog, a sailboat, or a Japanese samurai helmet beetle. Origami can be extraordinarily complicat ...

Decision cascades in social networks

How do people in a social network behave? How are opinions, decisions and behaviors of individuals influenced by their online networks? Can the application of math help answer these questions?

Mathematicians prove the Umbral Moonshine Conjecture

Monstrous moonshine, a quirky pattern of the monster group in theoretical math, has a shadow - umbral moonshine. Mathematicians have now proved this insight, known as the Umbral Moonshine Conjecture, offering ...

Dawn spirals closer to Ceres, returns a new view
Researchers prove magnetism can control heat, sound
Unlearning implicit social biases during sleep
Understanding how cells follow electric fields
House call primary care practices vary substantially
Self-replicating nanostructures made from DNA

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