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Mathematics news

Mathematicians solve 60-year-old problem

A team of researchers, led by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute professor Yuri Lvov, has found an elegant explanation for the long-standing Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) problem, first proposed in 1953, investigated ...

dateMar 23, 2015 in Mathematics
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On Pi Day, how scientists use this number

If you like numbers, you will love March 14, 2015. When written as a numerical date, it's 3/14/15, corresponding to the first six digits of pi (3.1415)—a once-in-a-century coincidence! Pi Day, which would ...

dateMar 13, 2015 in Mathematics
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Professor takes madness out of the month

With the NCAA Men's and Women's Basketballl Tournaments tipping off soon, brackets and bubble-busters are reaching a fever pitch. Dr. Jay Coleman, the Richard deRaismes Kip Professor of Operations Management and Quantitative ...

dateMar 05, 2015 in Mathematics
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Geometry's least-packable shapes

If you've ever struggled to pack a bunch of suitcases into the trunk of your car, you've got some idea of a basic problem in materials science: if you throw a bunch of atoms or molecules together, how do ...

dateMar 03, 2015 in Mathematics
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Study reveals inner workings of cricket teams

Do batsmen put personal glory before their team? A study by QUT researchers found cricket batsmen who were close to reaching personal milestones were likely to alter their strategy in a way which, at first ...

dateFeb 10, 2015 in Mathematics
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Origami—mathematics in creasing

Origami is the ancient Japanese art of paper folding. One uncut square of paper can, in the hands of an origami artist, be folded into a bird, a frog, a sailboat, or a Japanese samurai helmet beetle. Origami can be extraordinarily complicat ...

dateJan 07, 2015 in Mathematics
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Decision cascades in social networks

How do people in a social network behave? How are opinions, decisions and behaviors of individuals influenced by their online networks? Can the application of math help answer these questions?

Mathematicians prove the Umbral Moonshine Conjecture

Monstrous moonshine, a quirky pattern of the monster group in theoretical math, has a shadow - umbral moonshine. Mathematicians have now proved this insight, known as the Umbral Moonshine Conjecture, offering ...

Shifting boundaries and changing surfaces

New research published in the Proceedings of The Royal Society A by members of the Mathematical Soft Matter Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University examines the en ...

Uncovering complex network structures in nature

The global spread of Ebola is due to the complex interactions between individuals, societies, and transportation and trade networks. Understanding and building appropriate statistical and mathematical models ...

Finding the simple patterns in a complex world

An ANU mathematician has developed a new way to uncover simple patterns that might underlie apparently complex systems, such as clouds, cracks in materials or the movement of the stockmarket.

Golden Ratio offers unity of science

It is said to represent a "cosmic constant" found in the curvature of elephant tusks, the shape of a kudu's horn, the destructive beauty of Hurricane Katrina, and in the astronomical grandeur of how planets, ...

Passengers boarding airplanes—we're doing it wrong

'Tis the season for airplane travel. We may be looking forward to getting where we're going, but most aspects of the travel itself are merely endured. There's stressful security, the madding crowd and the ...

Risk analysis for a complex world

Developing adaptable systems for finance and international relations could help reduce the risk of major systemic collapses such as the 2008 financial crisis, according to a new analysis.

Solving the future with abstract algebra

Ask people what they know about the frontiers of mathematics research, and the response is usually some variation on: "What is there to research about math?"

New idea for Dyson sphere proposed
Fruit flies crucial to basic research
Crete's mystery croc killed by cold snap
Apple Watch to spark wearable tech growth: IDC
'Atomic chicken-wire' is key to faster DNA sequencing
Turning back time by controlling magnetic interactions
Classroom behaviour and dyslexia research
Lightbulb using graphene is to go on sale this year
Rocky planets may orbit many double stars
Hunting for living fossils in Indonesian waters

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