Rockefeller University

A longer lasting tumor blocker

On the heels of dismaying reports that a promising antitumor drug could, in theory, shorten patients' long-term survival, comes a promising study by a Japanese team of researchers that suggests a potentially better option. ...

Apr 28, 2009
not rated yet 0

Building the lymphatic drainage system

Our bodies' tissues need continuous irrigation and drainage. Blood vessels feeding the tissues bring in the fluids, and drainage occurs via the lymphatic system. While much is known about how blood vessels are built, the ...

Apr 27, 2009
not rated yet 0

New nucleotide could revolutionize epigenetics

Anyone who studied a little genetics in high school has heard of adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine - the A,T,G and C that make up the DNA code. But those are not the whole story. The rise of epigenetics in the past decade ...

Apr 16, 2009
4.8 / 5 (6) 0

SIRT1 takes down tumors

Yuan et al. have identified another anti-cancer effect of the "longevity" protein SIRT1. By speeding the destruction of the tumor promoter c-Myc, SIRT1 curbs cell division. The study will be published online ...

Apr 13, 2009
4.6 / 5 (5) 0

HIV pays a price for invisibility

Mutations that help HIV hide from the immune system undermine the virus's ability to replicate, show an international team of researchers in the April 13 issue of the Journal of Experimental Medicine. The study was publis ...

Apr 13, 2009
3 / 5 (4) 1

When cancer cells can't let go

Like a climber scaling a rock face, a migrating cancer cell has to keep a tight grip on the surface but also let go at the right moment to move ahead. Chan et al. reveal that the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) ...

Apr 13, 2009
3 / 5 (1) 0

Scientists show how a neuron gets its shape

(PhysOrg.com) -- Ask a simple question, get a simple answer: When Abraham Lincoln was asked how long a man’s legs should be, he absurdly replied, “Long enough to reach the ground.” Now, by using a new microscopy technique ...

Apr 02, 2009
4 / 5 (1) 1

Lipid droplets lead a Spartin existence

Spartin, a protein linked to the neuronal disease Troyer syndrome, was thought to function in endocytosis. In the March 23, 2009 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology, Eastman et al. identify an unexpected role f ...

Mar 23, 2009
5 / 5 (1) 0