The Rockefeller University is a private university offering postgraduate and postdoctoral education. It has a strong concentration in the biological sciences. It is also known for producing numerous Nobel laureates. The Rockefeller University is located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City, between 63rd and 68th Streets along York Avenue. Marc Tessier-Lavigne—previously executive vice president of research and chief scientific officer at Genentech—is the university's tenth president. The Rockefeller University Press publishes the Journal of Experimental Medicine, the Journal of Cell Biology, and The Journal of General Physiology. What is now The Rockefeller University was founded in June 1901 as The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research—often called simply The Rockefeller Institute—by John D. Rockefeller, who had founded the University of Chicago in 1889, upon advice by his adviser Frederick T. Gates and action taken in March 1901 by his son, John D. Rockefeller Jr. Greatly elevating the prestige of American science and medicine, it was America's first biomedical institute, like France's Pasteur Institute (1888) and Germany's Robert Koch Institute (1891).

Address
1230 York Ave, New York City, New York, United States of America 10065
Website
http://rockefeller.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockefeller_University

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