American Society of Agronomy

Benefits of Bt corn go beyond rootworm resistance

Engineered to produce the bacterial toxin, Bt, "Bt corn" resists attack by corn rootworm, a pest that feeds on roots and can cause annual losses of up to $1 billion. But besides merely protecting against these losses, the ...

dateFeb 06, 2013 in Ecology
shares0 comments 0

Understanding the historical probability of drought

Droughts can severely limit crop growth, causing yearly losses of around $8 billion in the United States. But it may be possible to minimize those losses if farmers can synchronize the growth of crops with periods of time ...

dateJan 30, 2013 in Environment
shares0 comments 0

Corn could help farmers fight devastating weed

Versatile and responsive to management, corn is grown throughout the world for everything from food to animal feed to fuel. A new use for corn could soon join that list, as researchers in China investigate the crop's ability ...

dateJan 07, 2013 in Biotechnology
shares0 comments 2

Antibiotic-eating bug unearthed in soil

It's well known how bacteria exposed to antibiotics for long periods will find ways to resist the drugs—by quickly pumping them out of their cells, for instance, or modifying the compounds so they're no longer toxic.

dateDec 07, 2012 in Earth Sciences
shares0 comments 1

Printing soil science

Imagine printing a 3-D object as easily as a typed document. Lose a button? Print one. Need a new coffee cup? Print one. While the reality of printing any object on demand may lie in the future, the technology necessary to ...

dateNov 28, 2012 in Engineering
shares0 comments 1

The Phosphorus Index: Changes afoot

Phosphorus (P) is both an essential nutrient in agricultural fields and a contributor to poor water quality in surface waters. To encourage improved P management in fields, the P Index was proposed as a risk assessment tool ...

dateNov 06, 2012 in Environment
shares0 comments 0

Time is ticking for some crop's wild relatives

A botanist brings a species of alfalfa from Siberia, to the United States. His hope? The plant survives, and leads to a new winter-hardy alfalfa. But what also happened during this time in the late 1800's, isn't just a story ...

dateMay 30, 2012 in Plants & Animals
shares0 comments 0